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12 results for Hurricanes--Outer Banks--History
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Record #:
7358
Author(s):
Abstract:
The high winds and flooding of the Great Storm of 1899 drove residents of Shackleford Banks and Ca'e (Cape) Banks from their homes forever. Survivors migrated to Morehead City, Harkers Island, Marshallberg, and Salter Path where they built new homes and continued their community traditions. The original settlers arrived in the 1700s and by the mid-1800s, the population of the banks had reached around eight hundred. Life revolved around whaling and fishing. In 1999, six hundred descendants of the settlers gathered on the banks to mark the one hundredth anniversary of the storm.
Full Text:
Record #:
29984
Abstract:
The hurricane of 1944 hit Avon, North Carolina with a vengeance, washing away stores, homes, and other structures from their foundations. The short lived hurricane pushed back the sound waters with high tides, causing flooding to bust through dunes and ruin freshwater cisterns.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1985, p18-19, por
Record #:
29983
Abstract:
When the hurricane of 1933 came to Hatteras, the residents were battened down. Although houses were washed out and trees broken down, the villagers on the Island continued to stay put.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1985, p10-11, por
Record #:
29985
Author(s):
Abstract:
When a hurricane hit Avon, North Carolina on September 14, 1944, residents of the Outer Banks were used to bygone years of inundation and erosion, and early morning preparation were being made to move furniture and goods. But the hurricane reached 150 miles an hour, rushing the ocean tides into the Pamlico Sound, cutting the dunes, and ripping possessions and homes from their owners.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1985, p20-29, por
Record #:
36025
Abstract:
Clarence Jennette’s memories recalled were of the area’s well-known 1933 and 1944 hurricanes. The Hatteras residents’ method of battening down the hatches and waiting it out—has proven to help them weather any storm.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1985, p8-9
Record #:
36003
Author(s):
Abstract:
It had dominated short wave radio broadcasts on September 12, 1944, and still dominated the memories of many residents. Power to generate remembrance could be explained by the winds, exceeding 100 miles per hour, and 96 of the 115 homes damaged or washed off their blocks. Perhaps, though, a greater explanation can lie in no human casualties or homes badly damaged. From that, God at work in the midst of Mother Nature’s wrath was a possibility still speculated.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 1, Fall 1978, p16-17
Record #:
36011
Author(s):
Abstract:
The resident named for her father’s mule or a family member held values characteristic of Hatteras Island life, such as deep religious beliefs. Activities betraying the time in which she grew up included her mother sewing clothes for a family of twelve. Ways she made a personal mark on her world included opening her home to tourists and village newcomers alike. From such acts of hospitality, a life commonly lived might also be called an uncommon life.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 1, Fall 1978, p48-52
Record #:
36021
Abstract:
Its recently celebrated centennial history included the destruction of its first structure by the Hurricane of 1933. As donations and many member fundraising efforts proved, a house of God wasn’t made just from newer wood and nails, not even the original lamps and piano.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Fall/Winter 1982, p18-19
Record #:
36026
Abstract:
This article, part of a series for this edition, recounted Hatteras Island’s experience with the well-known 1933 and 1944 hurricanes. What it has in common with “Storm Memories” was personal accounts, in this case of a family, the Austins, rather than an individual, Clarence Jennette.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1985, p12-13
Record #:
36028
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article, part of a series for this edition, chronicled Hatteras Island’s encounters with well-known 1933 and 1944 hurricanes. This recollection by Ernal Foster, included photos illustrating the 1933 storm’s impact, proved pictures can be worth a thousand words.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1985, p15-17
Record #:
36027
Abstract:
A resident of this town, renamed Frisco since Maggie Austin’s experience with the 1944 hurricane, recalled its terrifying impact. What hadn’t changed: the resilience residents exhibited.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1985, p14
Record #:
37624
Author(s):
Abstract:
Annotated transcription of a letter Mrs. Sarah Ann Clark, of Portsmouth Island, NC, 1846.