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7 results for Domestic violence
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Record #:
20168
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Abstract:
The major change in small claims legislation in this year's NC General Assembly was an increase in the jurisdictional amount for cases that can be heard by a magistrate. The other area with major change is domestic violence. The bulletin also discusses other non-criminal legislation affecting magistrates.
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Administration of Justice Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7908 .A15 U6), Vol. Issue 4, Sept 1999, p1-13, f
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Record #:
24981
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Julie Owens is a domestic violence speaker. After her own terrifying ordeal, she chose to make a difference in the lives of other abused women. She provides support and instruction on how to get out of the abusive relationship. Her seminars specifically target educating religious leaders on what to do if someone comes to them for help.
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Record #:
27461
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The murder of Dawn Jolly by her husband Randall Jolly on September 18, 1989 prompted a response by the Women of Orange County. The group has stated that the criminal justice system is soft on domestic violence and failed to protect Dawn Jolly. Trying to determine what is wrong with the system and how to fix it, excerpts from 30 interviews are pieced together highlighting the challenges of protecting against domestic. Those interviewed and quoted include judges, lawyers, police officers, abused women, and women’s rights advocates.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 8 Issue 25, June 20-26 1990, p6-10 Periodical Website
Record #:
28302
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After years of domestic violence, a woman and her child fled to Raleigh to start a new life. She is one of thousands of women who seek help from domestic violence each year in the Triangle area. A Wake County nonprofit, Interact, helps victims navigate the legal system while balancing work, school, and family obligations. The woman tells her personal story and how other women like her struggle to have normal lives.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 35, August 2007, p16-23 Periodical Website
Record #:
36226
Abstract:
Standards have been adopted to assure legal counsel for all includes those classified as LEP (Limited English Proficiency). It includes services where court interpreters may be provided and tips for attorneys assisting LEP clients. To demonstrate the need for this service these statistics: cases involving domestic violence and homelessness; children and seniors eligible for legal aid but not receiving it because of this cultural barrier.
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Record #:
36477
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Illustrating the research-based positive emotional and psychological impact of pet ownership is pet therapy. Involving trained animals contributing to stress reduction in humans, pet therapy takes place in in facilities such as hospitals, correctional institutions, and homeless shelters. Examples of facilities offering pet therapy mentioned are Reuter Children’s Outpatient Hospital and UNC Asheville’s Peers Educating Peers and Advancing Health Program (PEPAH).
Record #:
39935
Author(s):
Abstract:
Successor of the first black female ordained rabbi, Karz-Wagman became the first male rabbi in a decade for Bayt Shalom. His passion for social justice, coupled with legal experience, can be filtered seamlessly into his faith tradition’s call for social justice and adherence to Jewish law.
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