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9 results for Fiction--North Carolina
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Record #:
27720
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Abstract:
Samuel Montgomery-Blinn is the winner of a 2014 Indie Art Award. Montgomery-Blinn is the publisher of Bull Spec, a web-only magazine of speculative fiction. Montgomery-Blinn is known as a community builder and has given a platform to unknown North Carolina science fiction and fantasy authors. Raising the visibility of authors has helped many find an audience and gain recognition among their peers and readers.
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Record #:
34631
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Bauer interviews North Carolina-native author Charles Frazier, who incorporates North Carolina history into his novels. He discusses the genre, his own influences, and how we wrote the novel to incorporate the language, scenery, and character personalities of North Carolina. This article incorporates two separate interviews between the author and Frazier.
Source:
North Carolina Literary Review (NoCar PS 266 N8 N66x), Vol. 22 Issue 1, 2013, p21-41, il, por, f Periodical Website
Record #:
34632
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Bauer discusses the shift in focus from literary fiction to historical fiction and the authors behind what she calls a “renaissance”. She attributes much of this shift to the success of Charles Frazier’s novel Cold Mountain, which sat on the New York Times Bestseller list for over a year. This is an excerpt from a 2012 presentation.
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Record #:
34633
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In this interview, author Anna Jean Mayhew discusses her debut novel titled “The Dry Grass of August”. Set in North Carolina during the Civil Rights movement, the author used personal experience and research as inspiration for her novel. She also discusses the people she based her characters on, the process of writing and publishing, and her next novel.
Source:
North Carolina Literary Review (NoCar PS 266 N8 N66x), Vol. 22 Issue 1, 2013, p44-61, il, por, f Periodical Website
Record #:
34641
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Abstract:
This article focuses on interviews conducted with Robert Morgan, a native North Carolina author of historical fiction. He discusses his choice to make the main character a woman, the balance he must create between the character’s point of view and the history of the battle, and his inspirations throughout his writing career.
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Record #:
34640
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Native North Carolinian author Wiley Cash is interviewed for this article. Writer of A Land More Kind than Home, Cash discusses the inspiration behind the novel, why he chose to set it in North Carolina, and his approach to addressing issues that he sees in religion, power, and family dynamics.
Source:
North Carolina Literary Review (NoCar PS 266 N8 N66x), Vol. 22 Issue 1, 2013, p92-104, il, por, f Periodical Website
Record #:
34656
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Abstract:
William Forstchen’s novel “One Second After” focuses on a fictional post-apocalyptic event that takes place in Black Mountain, North Carolina. After an electromagnetic pulse devastates the entire United States, the small town reverts to a militaristic, patriarchal society that secludes itself from the rest of the world. Amende notes the “Southern” traditions that the town leaders continuously attribute to their success of survival: Christian political and religious beliefs, military values, and keeping away “outsiders”.
Source:
North Carolina Literary Review (NoCar PS 266 N8 N66x), Vol. 23 Issue 1, 2014, p68-77, il, por, f Periodical Website
Record #:
39920
Author(s):
Abstract:
The setting in Shelia Turnage’s novels proves that facts from a writer’s life always find their way into his or her fiction. Tupelo’s Landing resembles the town where Turnage lives and any small town in the South. Evidence includes a list of lines quoted from her Dale and Mo mystery series.
Source:
Greenville: Life in the East (NoCar F264 G8 G743), Vol. Issue , Fall 2015 , p50-52, 54
Record #:
41276
Abstract:
This bibliography contains sources about or inspired by the state, people, and culture. Categories include: biography and autobiography; foodways; genealogy and genealogical sources; local history; statewide history; poetry; politics and social issues; sports and recreation; science and nature.