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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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29 results for Civil War
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Record #:
22572
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This article details a tailor from Salisbury, North Carolina who specializes in making historically accurate military uniforms, from the American Revolution through World War II and other conflicts. The author discusses how he got his start, and how his attention to detail has made him a sought after source of information.
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Record #:
22570
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In this article, the author discusses the events that lead to the end of the Civil War, beyond the surrender of Lee's Army at Appomattox Courthouse. The author also discusses events that occurred after the surrender of the Confederacy, such as General Sherman being relieved of command and issues involving transportation of veterans from Virginia back to their homes.
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Record #:
22571
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This article details the story of an artifact hunter from Hillsborough, North Carolina named Joe Crews. The article details how Crews got his start in artifact hunting, and what kind of artifacts he has found, including a Civil War name tag belonging to the youngest man to ever enlist in the Union Army.
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Record #:
24458
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The author presents women from North Carolina during the Revolutionary and Civil Wars and how they participated in protecting their state and property. For example, some women spied on British troops for American soldiers during the Revolutionary War.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 59 Issue 1, June 1991, p12-13, por
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Record #:
24465
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Confederate First Lady Varina Davis, wife of Jefferson Davis, was in Raleigh in 1862 during General Joseph Johnston’s attack on Richmond, Virginia. This article uses primary sources to recount what the First Lady experienced as she worried for her husband’s safety in Richmond.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 59 Issue 2, July 1991, p12-13, por
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Record #:
24476
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The Battle of Fort Branch took place in July 1862, and the battle is recreated every November for three days at the Fort Branch Re-Enactment and Living History Program.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 59 Issue 6, November 1991, p23-25, il
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Record #:
25364
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David Long, an associate professor at ECU, describes his class on the history of the Civil War as well as his knowledge on Abraham Lincoln.
Record #:
27899
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Major General Lawrence O’Bryan Branch, was one of the South’s most promising military and potential political leaders. As the Civil War progressed, Confederate forces suffered a shortage of officers and Branch was given command of a North Carolina brigade comprising five regiments. After the Battle of New Bern and numerous skirmishes, Branch was killed on the battlefield of Sharpsburg.
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Record #:
28160
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Early in the American Civil War the Union blockaded the southern states’ main ports. Wilmington was the last significant port that could harbor blockade runners to assist the Confederacy. The fort was finally taken by Union forces led by Alfred H. Terry on January 15, 1865.
Record #:
30908
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A map found by an Department of Archives and History assistant archaeologist, while researching a project site, led to the discovery of two undocumented Civil War gun emplacements. These Emplacements, part on the earthworks created to protect the Old Georgetown Road, were excavated and recorded prior to their destruction in order to create a discharge canal for the newly constructed nuclear power plant.
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Record #:
31721
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The son of the famous African missionary met his untimely fate in Salisbury. After changing his name and joining the Union Army as a substitute, Robert Livingstone was captured in VA and sent to a confederate prison in Salisbury, NC. There he died in a possible escape attempt and was buried in an unmarked mass grave.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 59 Issue 3, Aug 1991, p12-13
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Record #:
32238
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The late Chief Justice Walter Clarke gives a detailed description of the part North Carolina’s troops played in the battle of Gettysburg. This article is the first part of a piece published in The North Carolina Booklet.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 12, Nov 1958, p13-14, il
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Record #:
32380
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The late Chief Justice Walter Clarke gives a detailed description of the part North Carolina’s troops played in the battle of Gettysburg. This article is the final part of a piece published in The North Carolina Booklet.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 14, Nov 1958, p13-14
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Record #:
34413
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Author Charles Frazier, born in Asheville and raised in Cherokee County, has a deep family ancestry in the Appalachian region of North Carolina. Frazier’s first novel, Cold Mountain, was a depiction of Appalachia, its culture and people. His latest work, Varina, is a biography of Varina Davis, wife of Confederate President Jefferson Davis, and delves into the culpability of the Civil War and the South’s legacy of slavery.
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Record #:
34656
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William Forstchen’s novel “One Second After” focuses on a fictional post-apocalyptic event that takes place in Black Mountain, North Carolina. After an electromagnetic pulse devastates the entire United States, the small town reverts to a militaristic, patriarchal society that secludes itself from the rest of the world. Amende notes the “Southern” traditions that the town leaders continuously attribute to their success of survival: Christian political and religious beliefs, military values, and keeping away “outsiders”.
Source:
North Carolina Literary Review (NoCar PS 266 N8 N66x), Vol. 23 Issue 1, 2014, p68-77, il, por, f Periodical Website