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36 results for Charlotte--History
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Record #:
939
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The Confederate Navy Yard in Charlotte operated for three years during the American Civil War.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 60 Issue 9, Feb 1993, p32-34, por
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Record #:
10768
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On May 20, 1968, the anniversary of the signing of the Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence, Charlotte will celebrate its bicentennial. A bill introduced by Senator Sam Ervin, Jr. and cosponsored by Senator B. Everett Jordan making May 20 \"Charlotte Day\" was signed into law by President Lyndon Johnson. Mrs. Johnson accepted Mayor Brookshire's invitation to come to Charlotte and dedicate the restored birthplace of the 11th president of the United States, James K. Polk, and the Hezekiah Alexander Home, built in 1774. The town of Charlotte was named for the wife of King George III of England, and the county, Mecklenburg, was named for Charlotte's royal house in Germany. Charlottetown, as it was then known, was built on 369 acres donated by Lord Proprietor George Augustus Selwyn and was chartered on December 7, 1768.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 36 Issue 4, July 1968, p8, il
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Record #:
19503
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A deeper dig into Charlotte reveals a surprising hidden history, from textile mills and James Brown records, to sit-ins against discriminatory practices and German prisoners of war in Myers Park.
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Record #:
20416
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It was not until 1978 that after multiple attempts, serving of liquor became legal in Charlotte. McShane discusses the history of bringing liquor-by-the-drink to Charlotte.
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Record #:
21001
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This article looks at the history of Charlotte and Mecklenburg County on the occasion of its 200th anniversary. Attention is given to its more notable citizens, including President James K. Polk, as well as a kind of utopian sentiment about the area's first century. Details on local industry, politics, and development are also included.
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Record #:
20999
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This article looks at historical acts indicative of a spirit of independence in Mecklenberg County and its county seat, Charlotte, that predate American independence and the Revolutionary War.
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Record #:
22780
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Part 11 of the Story of Charlotte series, \"A Time of Unrest,\" covers the history of integration, racial unrest, urban renewal, and the passage of new liquor laws in Charlotte during the 1960s and 1970s. Points of racial contention mentioned include the Shrine Bowl, Swann v. Board of Education, and the midnight bombings of four civil rights leaders' homes in November of 1965. As the city began to expand, racial tension from urban renewal arose, and outlying neighborhoods fought unsuccessfully to avoid being engulfed by the growing metropolis.
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Record #:
23571
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Charlotte music venues have held an important place in the city's culture. This article outlines the evolving history of these venues.
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Record #:
23575
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Various authors recount the history of five of Charlotte's roads: Trade and Tryon, Queens Road West, Independence Boulevard, Wilkinson Boulevard, and Randolph Road. The stories of these roads highlight the history and evolution of the Queen City.
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Record #:
23574
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Author, Melissa Bashor, details the history of Eastland Mall--a mall located in Charlotte's east side--through her memories of the place.
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Record #:
24063
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Streetcars were an important part of North Carolina towns during the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries. Originally, mules and horses pulled these cars, but in 1889, Asheville opened the first electric streetcar system in the state. Charlotte and Raleigh followed, and the streetcar allowed such cities to expand and establish suburban neighborhoods. By the 1930s, automobiles and buses replaced the streetcar, but today the system has been revived in the form of Charlotte's CityLYNX Gold Line, which runs three replica trolleys on a 1.5-mile track.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 5, October 2015, p43-44, 46, 48, il Periodical Website
Record #:
24124
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Charlotte's Hebrew Cemetery is a Jewish burial ground that is not only a place to revere the dead, but also provides insight into Jewish culture and Charlotte's history. Mayors, politicians, Confederate soldiers, and other important Charlotte residents are buried here.
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Record #:
24435
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In May 1791, George Washington visited Charlotte, North Carolina and found it to be an unimpressive and ‘trifling place.’ This article discusses why the President felt that way and how the city has since changed.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 60 Issue 12, May 1993, p10-14, por
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Record #:
24898
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An examination of the life of an average citizen living in Charlotte in 1968 provides a view of the history of race relations, from the desegregation lunch counters to the still-present dangers for African Americans today.
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Record #:
24920
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Various former players and those who got the ball rolling on the Charlotte Hornets relay their experience from the very beginning of trying to get the team for Charlotte all the way to the first hornet baby. They struggles and the successes are all told from various perspectives making an interesting view of one of Charlotte's favorite memories.
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Charlotte Magazine (NoCar F 264.C4), Vol. 18 Issue 11, November 2013, p44-51, 100, 102, 104-111, il, por Periodical Website
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