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11 results for Civil rights movement
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Record #:
12221
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Abstract:
Editorial opinions regarding the Supreme Court ruling involving desegregation are provided for the following localities: Charlotte, Rockingham, Albemarle, Greensboro, Fuquay, Lillington, Fayetteville, Morgantown, Marion, and Aberdeen. In general, opinions are offered by the editors of local papers and are mainly against integration.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 25 Issue 18, Jan 1958, p9-10, 18, por
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Record #:
21459
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A look at the history of and controversy surrounding the 1944 publication of \"What the Negro Wants\" by the University of North Carolina Press as an example of racial paternalism and a startling instance of southern liberal hypocrisy in the prehistory of the civil rights movement. The publication was a collection of essays written by fourteen African American leaders calling for an end to segregation and dispensing with the idea of reforming the old system of race relations in favor of establishing a new one.
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Record #:
21539
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An examination of the Williamston Freedom Movement, that began with a 32 consecutive-day period in the summer of 1963 and continued into the following year. African Americans held nightly meetings, formulated sweeping demands, and participated in dozens of marches and sit-ins that included a school boycott of segregated education and an economic boycott of white-owned business in Williamston.
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Record #:
21711
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W.E.B. DuBois High School was founded in 1926 as the Wake Forest Graded School and expanded to include high school in 1929. The school served African-American students until 1970, when a school integration program was established. The school was the focus of the African-American community in Wake Forest as it broadened the social and cultural capital of its students.
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Record #:
21718
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During the late 1930s, Louis Austin was editor-publisher of Durham, North Carolina's 'Carolina Times,' the city's black newspaper. Austin was a confrontational activist against racial segregation who utilized legal action and electoral politics through the Democratic Party.
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Record #:
23100
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Lunch counters and restaurants now provide an opportunity for races and classes to interact and form communities. In the 1950s and 1960s, however, segregation did not allow black citizens to eat at lunch counters, sparking sit-ins and the Civil Rights Movement across the South
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Record #:
25608
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Twenty-five years later, The INDEPENDENT takes a look back at lessons learned from the Greensboro Sit-Ins. This reflection also includes personal interviews with residents that witnessed the Sit-Ins.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 3 Issue 1, January 18-31 1984, p10-11, por Periodical Website
Record #:
29073
Abstract:
June 23 was the sixtieth anniversary of the 1957 Royal Ice Cream sit-in, where seven African Americans demanded to be served inside the segregated Royal Ice Cream Parlor in north Durham and were arrested for it. The demonstration is often overlooked in civil rights history because sit-ins were not rampant at that time.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 23, June 28 2017, p18, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
29157
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Durham, North Carolina-based architect Phil Freelon is the new internationally acclaimed architect of record for the Smithsnonian National Museum of African American History and Culture. Among the museum's artifacts are stools form the Woolworth's lunch counter in Greensboro, North Carolina where the fateful sit-in took place in 1960. Freelon also designed the International Civil Rights Center and Museum in Greensboro, that occupies that same Woolworths.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 4, September 2017, p166-168, 170, por Periodical Website
Record #:
34633
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In this interview, author Anna Jean Mayhew discusses her debut novel titled “The Dry Grass of August”. Set in North Carolina during the Civil Rights movement, the author used personal experience and research as inspiration for her novel. She also discusses the people she based her characters on, the process of writing and publishing, and her next novel.
Source:
North Carolina Literary Review (NoCar PS 266 N8 N66x), Vol. 22 Issue 1, 2013, p44-61, il, por, f Periodical Website