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15 results for Civil rights
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Record #:
139
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The Civil Rights Act of 1991 shifts the power back toward plaintiffs and increases the potential liability of employers, including state and local government employers.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 57 Issue 3, Winter 1992, p17-21, f
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Record #:
1909
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White examines some of the high points and low points of the North Carolina Supreme Court during its first 175 years, including such issues as free speech, civil rights, and jail conditions.
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Record #:
7180
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The 1960s in North Carolina were a tumultuous period. The civil rights movement had taken root with the Greensboro sit-ins. Racial tensions were high across the state, and riots, sit-ins, and demonstrations on streets and in businesses were common. Against this background of unrest, Jim Williams, owner of Turnage's Barbecue Place in Durham, made the decision to integrate his restaurant in May 1963. It was the first Durham restaurant to integrate. Williams also talked the owners of The Blue Light and Rebel Drive Inn into joining him. Warren recounts Williams's life and the historic moment in Durham.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 12, May 2005, p30-32, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
9954
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Mrs. Moffitt Sinclair Henderson of Salisbury used her personal copy of “Proceedings and Debates of the convention of North Carolina Called to Amend the Constitution of the State” as source material for her new book on the life of Samuel Price Carson. The volume, given to Mrs. Henderson by her maternal grandfather who was Carson's brother, contains eyewitness accounts of what may have been North Carolina's first public debate on civil rights. Delegates to the 1835 convention met in Raleigh to amend the original constitution of North Carolina and heard impassioned arguments by Carson supporting a failed bid to strike Article 32, which restricted Catholics and Jews from holding public office. Carson left North Carolina soon after the convention, following his friend Sam Houston to Texas and helping to establish that new Republic, eventually becoming its first Secretary of State.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 40 Issue 18, Apr 1973, p19, por
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Record #:
21689
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This article examines the 1953 order of Bishop Vincent S. Water to integrate two separate white and black parishes in Newton Grove. This first attempt to integrate Catholic parishes in the South was met with strong resistance from white members of the community.
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Record #:
21709
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Vincent Waters, Bishop of Raleigh, worked tirelessly between 1945 and 1974 to improve the lives of Catholic African-Americans throughout North Carolina. He attempted to integrate parishes and schools under his jurisdiction, ordain black priests, and was a leader of the state's civil rights struggles.
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Record #:
21711
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W.E.B. DuBois High School was founded in 1926 as the Wake Forest Graded School and expanded to include high school in 1929. The school served African-American students until 1970, when a school integration program was established. The school was the focus of the African-American community in Wake Forest as it broadened the social and cultural capital of its students.
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Record #:
21853
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Prior to the 1897 election of activist congressman George Henry White, fewer than a dozen African-Americans had served as postmasters in North Carolina. After his election, White pushed for a significant increase in black postmasters with a high of 34 being appointed by Republican leadership. The rise of white supremacy led to the quick downfall of black postmasters by 1900 when only three were left in North Carolina.
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Record #:
21852
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This article discusses the creation of doctoral program in education at North Carolina College (NCC) in the early 1950s. The program was created in an attempt to skirt US Supreme Court decisions that called for more equal higher education for blacks. The program lasted for 11 years before it collapsed as it lacked the support of the black community who saw it as separate and unequal education.
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Record #:
21857
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This article discusses Reginald Hawkins, an African-American dentist and minister who ran for governor in North Carolina in 1968. During the 1950s and 1960s, Hawkins worked to desegregate Charlotte though he did not endear himself to the black and white communities with his militant leadership style.
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Record #:
27214
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Durham City Councilor Jillian Johnson has an active presence at civil rights protests, despite being an elected official. Last Monday, Johnson wrote on her personal Facebook page about gun control, the no-fly list and FBI anti-terror efforts. The post has prompted raging debates over her criticisms of law enforcement and her position of power.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 26, June 2016, p8-9, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
27490
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On August 15-19, NC Central University hosted the first annual National Civil Rights Reunion and African-American Leadership Training Institute. The purpose was to reunite those who fought for civil rights during the 1960s and to educate and inspire the next generation of activists. Freedom Riders, members of the NAACP, the Congress of Racial Equality, and members of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee, among others, were present and spoke at the conference.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 8 Issue 35, Aug. 29-Sept. 4 1990, p6-7 Periodical Website
Record #:
27783
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Immigration court observers say government prosecutors continue to drop deportation cases in Alamance County. The amount of cases dropped is uncertain, but one estimate is over 24 cases have been dropped since September. The Department of Justice has been investigating the Alamance County Sheriff's office and has reported that the sheriff’s targeted Latino drivers and violated civil rights laws. Some activists believe a lawsuit is soon forthcoming against the department.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 29 Issue 47, November 2012, ponline Periodical Website
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Record #:
30706
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Four new bills have been introduced into Congress relating to civil rights. The proposed legislation is intended to strengthen protection of constitutional rights to all people. The bills act to increase safeguards for Federal voting rights, prevent acts of lynching, reorganize the Department of Justice to provide greater civil rights protection, and provide protections for members of the Armed Forces.
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Record #:
30875
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The United States is taking vital steps to strive for the goal of full equality under law for all people. Steps have been taken to strengthen legislation dealing with obstruction of justice, investigative authority for the FBI, power of the Attorney General to inspect Federal election records, programs of financial and technical aid to state and local agencies for school integration, provisions for education of children of members of the Armed Forces affected by desegregation closures, consideration of the establishment of a statutory Commission on Equal Job Opportunity Under Governmental Contracts, and the extension of the Civil Rights Commission.
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