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19 results for Restaurants--Durham
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Record #:
7180
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The 1960s in North Carolina were a tumultuous period. The civil rights movement had taken root with the Greensboro sit-ins. Racial tensions were high across the state, and riots, sit-ins, and demonstrations on streets and in businesses were common. Against this background of unrest, Jim Williams, owner of Turnage's Barbecue Place in Durham, made the decision to integrate his restaurant in May 1963. It was the first Durham restaurant to integrate. Williams also talked the owners of The Blue Light and Rebel Drive Inn into joining him. Warren recounts Williams's life and the historic moment in Durham.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 12, May 2005, p30-32, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
13726
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In this on-going series of articles called Expense Account Dining, Pace describes, Fishmonger's, a restaurant located in Durham.
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Record #:
13940
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Samuel Dillard opened his grocery store and restaurant in Durham in 1953. It closed on March 18, 2011 due to the uncertain economy in the state and country. Wallace reflects on the restaurant's fifty years. Dillard's barbecue featured a mustard-based sauce, which was different from the eastern vinegar and the western tomato.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 28 Issue 13, Mar 2011, p31 Periodical Website
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Record #:
14222
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Shaffer describes Wimpy's Grill in Durham where the well-known Garbage Burger is served.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 1, June 2011, p120-124, 126, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
21916
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One of Durham's beloved diners has closed. Honey's Restaurant and Catering, Durham's only 24-hour diner, closed in August. It opened in 1960, and had a devoted clientele. On its final day of operation, one former couple drove eleven hours from Ohio to enjoy one last meal.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 30 Issue 34, Aug 2013, p33, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
22787
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Durham's restaurant and bar scene is volatile, but this provides for an fascinating and complex historical study. A recent exhibit at the History Hub called \"F is For Food\" takes a stab at this difficult history. In addition to the exhibit, local cartographer Tim Stallman built a \"digital time machine,\" which virtually illustrates the past 25 years of Durham's restaurant history.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 32 Issue 19, May 2015, p14, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
27026
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Rose’s Meat Market and Sweet Shop in Durham butchers three or four pigs each week to make food like whiskey breakfast sausage, chorizo, and smoked pork chops. The bones are used in stock for ramen noodle dishes, a popular weekly lunch special. Rose’s rotates its ramen every three weeks and doesn’t repeat a recipe for an entire year.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 7, Feb 2016, p21, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
27106
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Thai Spoon and Thai China Buffet are two Thai restaurants in Durham that distinguish themselves in several ways. They both serve unusually memorable versions of the standards, and traditional dishes rarely seen in the South. Also, both restaurants are entirely family ventures.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 16, April 2016, p20-21, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
27108
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Counting House is a vegan restaurant in Durham. Owner Josh Munchel applied the idea of Nashville’s notorious hot chicken to tempeh, the meat substitute made from fermented soybeans.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 16, April 2016, p23, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
27128
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Durham chef and restaurateur Scott Howell opened NanaSteak as an attempt to reinvent the steakhouse. If every theater district demands a grand steakhouse, NanaSteak aims not just to deliver it but to remake it in the city's audacious modern image.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 18, May 2016, p22-23, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
27168
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Makus Empanadas is an Ameri-Argentine restaurant in Durham, owned by brothers Hernan and Santiago Moyano and their friend Ricky Yofre. The menu reflects a fusion of South American flavors with the American palate. One of the main features is the empadog, a thick hot dog baked in crispy empanada dough.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 21, May 2016, p30-31, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
27188
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Piedmont is the revitalized Durham restaurant where Greg Gettles has served as executive chef for the last year. His restaurant’s pretzels are the most popular item on the new bar snacks menu. The pretzels are served with a fondue based on a reduction of Mother Earth Brewing’s Weeping Willow Wit and local cheeses.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 23, June 2016, p17, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
27270
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Golden Belt is the last intact mill village in Durham. Its residents are lobbying the city to designate their neighborhood a local historic district, which would prevent unwanted new development or stabilize neighborhoods in transition. However, the Durham Rescue Mission is fighting against the designation because it would interfere with its plans to build a community center in the area.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 35, August 2016, p10-13, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
27474
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Crystal Dreisbach is the founder of Don’t Waste Durham, a community organization which hopes to reduce consumer waste. Dreisbach just launched a reusable takeout container program called GreenBox. With a special app, consumers can sign up to check out and return the containers at participating Durham restaurants.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 40, Oct 2016, p25, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
16604
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Linked with neighboring Chapel Hill, Durham is America's foodiest small town according to Andrew Knowlton in his October 2008 Bon Appetit article. Durham is hardly a small town, evolving into a city right before our eyes. New restaurants in the ambitiously revamped City Center are thriving, filled with a critical mass of hungry customers from nearby tobacco warehouse condos, Bulls games and Durham Performing Arts Center events.
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