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33 results for Recycling (Waste, etc.)
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Record #:
158
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina communities are encouraging citizens to recycle in order to reduce waste.
Source:
Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 42 Issue 2, Feb 1992, p1-8, il
Record #:
212
Author(s):
Abstract:
Businesses such as IBM, Cherokee Sanford, Dayco, Duke Power, and SAS Institute reap results from their respective recycling programs.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 50 Issue 5, May 1992, p24-33, il, por
Record #:
310
Abstract:
By 1993, 25% of waste is supposed to be diverted from the state's landfills. This may prove to be too much for local governments to handle, so a longer-lasting waste treatment program is needed.
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Record #:
574
Author(s):
Abstract:
The state took a stand on garbage control two years ago. Now many officials worry about the slow development of markets that will buy all the recyclable material that the law says cannot be thrown away.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 49 Issue 6, June 1991, p12-19, il
Record #:
1183
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Piedmont Environmental Center's new education center building is a monument to recycling from floor to roof, as virtually all components of the new building are constructed from recycled materials.
Source:
Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 43 Issue 8, Aug 1993, p4-5, por
Record #:
2322
Author(s):
Abstract:
A recycling project funded by the National Marine Fisheries Service shows promise of mitigating the problem of disposal of fishing industry refuse. In February, 1995, 22 tons of crab pots and nets were recycled by the state's commercial fishermen.
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Record #:
2320
Abstract:
Recycling by the state's municipalities has become profitable, bringing higher prices than two years ago. Because of previous contract commitments or insufficient personnel for handling recycling, however, not all cities are benefitting from the trend.
Source:
Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 45 Issue 5, May 1995, p1,6, il
Record #:
2349
Author(s):
Abstract:
With the state's goal of a 40 percent reduction in waste entering landfills and incinerators by the year 2001, residents are learning to precycle, recycle, and compost.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Mar/Apr 1995, p10-16, il Periodical Website
Record #:
2463
Author(s):
Abstract:
County recycling programs range from the cheapest, convenience centers where trash and recyclables are deposited, to curbside pickup, the most expensive. Counties consider factors like population density and citizen participation when choosing a program.
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Record #:
3267
Author(s):
Abstract:
Begun in 1990, the state's Solid Waste Management Trust Fund has awarded 118 grants totaling over $2 million to assist towns in waste reduction plans. Farmville in Pitt County used a grant to begin recycling office paper.
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Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 47 Issue 2, Feb 1997, p4, il
Record #:
3626
Author(s):
Abstract:
To encourage recycling and reduce waste going to landfills, some communities, including Wilmington, have adopted unit pricing, or paying for garbage based on what is disposed of. A benefit of this approach is that it is more equitable than a flat rate.
Source:
Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 48 Issue 1, Jan 1998, p11-12, il
Record #:
4710
Author(s):
Abstract:
The construction industry flourishes in the Research Triangle Metropolitan Area. However, construction and demolition landfills fill up rapidly, In fiscal year 1997-1998, Wake, Durham, and Orange Counties buried 330,000 tons of this waste. Preventing the loss of more open spaces to landfills each year requires more recycling of this waste. Proponents say builders will recycle when there is training for the building industry, local sites for dropping off recyclables, and high landfill fees for this type of waste.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 17 Issue 2, Jan 2000, p17, 19, il Periodical Website
Record #:
5274
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina has made progress in recycling waste; however, waste reduction varies among the state's one hundred counties, ranging from a high of 491.1 pounds per person in Montgomery County to a low of 4.17 in Robeson County. Coe and Hickman discuss reasons for this and practices municipalities and counties can use for waste reduction.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 67 Issue 2, Winter 2002, p19-27, il, f
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Record #:
16906
Author(s):
Abstract:
In this second in a series examining the state's trash, Ney discusses the problem with plastic bags. First introduced in grocery stores in the 1970s, now 90 percent of the shopping bags used worldwide are plastic and less than five percent are returned for recycling. Those thrown away endanger wildlife, emit toxic fumes if burned, contaminate soil, and pollute waterways. Ney discusses possible solutions.
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Record #:
16904
Author(s):
Abstract:
Ney begins a new series on waste that will examine some of the common items that are environmentally harmful, but are still tossed into landfills, and what can be done about them. North Carolinians throw away nine times more than they recycle. Ney discusses reasons why paper should be recycled.
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