NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


13 results for Guilford County--History
Currently viewing results 1 - 13
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
5082
Author(s):
Abstract:
America's leading killer-disease in the early 20th-century was tuberculosis. When 65 cases were reported in Guilford County in 1915 and 125 people died from it in 1920, a movement developed to build a sanatorium. The Guilford County Sanatorium opened in 1924, and averaging 120 patients at a time, the sanatorium provided quality care until it closed in 1955. In 1958, the Guilford Technical Community College opened and used the buildings for another ten years when they were replaced with newer ones.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
17506
Abstract:
Guilford County is the largest and in 1937 boasted being one of the most prominent in the state. Credentials Guilford County residents could be proud of included: having two thriving economic centers in Greensboro and High Point, having the most people employed in business and industry, and an extensive education system with two institutions of higher learning (The Woman's College of the University and the Agricultural and Technical College for Negroes).
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 4 Issue 10, Sept 1937, p15-21, por
Record #:
19912
Abstract:
The author attempts to track the population of African Americans in Guilford County prior to the Civil War, a difficult task because of the lack of records before 1790. There was little to no African Americans with the first settlement of Guilford County and only a slow growth in numbers from 1830 to 1860 with the increase of slavery. Statistical information is provided regarding the number of whites, free African Americans, and slaves in Guilford County between 1790 through 1870.
Full Text:
Record #:
24261
Abstract:
Dolly Madison, wife of President James Madison, was born in Guilford County, North Carolina. She was a known entertainer, but the origin of her red velvet dress remains a mystery for historians and curators. Some speculate that this dress may be made from the white house curtains, while others think it may have been a separate purchase, The dress has been on display in the National Portrait Gallery and in the Smithsonian, but today it resides in the Greensboro Historical Museum.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 3, August 2015, p108-110, 112, il, por, map Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
24517
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Old Timer’s Reunion Show is held every year in southeastern Guilford County near Climax and allows people to come together to experience machinery used to make work easier in the pre-electric and pre-small tractor days. Machinery included vintage wood saws, horse-drawn carts, old farm vehicles, and steam powered automobiles.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 45 Issue 1, June 1977, p22-24, il
Full Text:
Record #:
25104
Author(s):
Abstract:
T. Gilbert Pearson, an avid birder throughout much of his life, founded the Audubon Society of North Carolina in 1902. He also helped organize the National Association of Audubon Societies and pushed the first statewide game commission law in the Southeast through the North Carolina General Assembly. Pearson’s tireless efforts to preserve the bird population in North Carolina saved birds throughout the world.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 11, April 2016, p188-191, il, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
25608
Author(s):
Abstract:
Twenty-five years later, The INDEPENDENT takes a look back at lessons learned from the Greensboro Sit-Ins. This reflection also includes personal interviews with residents that witnessed the Sit-Ins.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 3 Issue 1, January 18-31 1984, p10-11, por Periodical Website
Record #:
29022
Author(s):
Abstract:
Memories of the Bailes Old Mill north of Greensboro, the history of millponds in North Carolina, and a family’s history are told. The author describes how his grandmother, Berta “Bee” Roberts, created a painting of Bailes Millpond and how the mill was tied to his family’s history.
Source:
Record #:
32515
Author(s):
Abstract:
On July 4, 1976, American’s celebrated the 200th anniversary of the signing of the Declaration of Independence. Following the commemoration, the Guilford County American Revolution Bicentennial Commission noted that the Battle of Guilford Courthouse fought March 15, 1781, was an important event in North Carolina history. Various plays, reenactments, and ceremonies are now recognizing this historical event.
Source:
Record #:
35684
Author(s):
Abstract:
The past made tactile was defined individually and collectively. The evidence had been excavated in Piedmont counties such as Alexander and Lakes such as High Rock. Tangible proof was represented in artifacts such as arrowheads, pipes, scrapers, and beads.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1978, p9, 54
Record #:
35733
Author(s):
Abstract:
Many places to go in NC, proven by the author. Evidence seen in historic towns such as Edenton and Halifax. Examples of historic houses were the House in a Horseshoe and Duke Homestead. Noted historic sites included Connemara and Guildford Courthouse National Military Park. As for outdoor sites of significance, they included Hammocks Beach and Nantahala National Forest.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 3, May/June 1979, p75-76, 79
Record #:
35818
Author(s):
Abstract:
The courtyard was part of what started as Brown’s Chapel, the elegy not alluding to the Thomas Gray’s Romantic poem. This elegy was remembrance of those in the graveyard for what became the schoolhouse. Stories shared by longtime residents with the author made evident the effort to keep the memories of ancestors and the church alive.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 1, Feb 1980, p15-16
Record #:
37889
Author(s):
Abstract:
The place with distinction statewide and national began in 1891 as Women’s College. Known now as the University of North Carolina-Greensboro, its alumni have earned distinction as Pulitzer Prize winning historians, NASA astronomers, and acclaimed artists. Distinction earned from local sources came from alumni like Alice Irby. Information about Irby noted her marks of distinction such as involvement with the 1960 Woolworth’s sit-ins.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 8, Jan 2014, p54-58, 60, 62-63 Periodical Website