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5 results for Audubon Society of North Carolina
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Record #:
25104
Author(s):
Abstract:
T. Gilbert Pearson, an avid birder throughout much of his life, founded the Audubon Society of North Carolina in 1902. He also helped organize the National Association of Audubon Societies and pushed the first statewide game commission law in the Southeast through the North Carolina General Assembly. Pearson’s tireless efforts to preserve the bird population in North Carolina saved birds throughout the world.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 11, April 2016, p188-191, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
26892
Author(s):
Abstract:
Seven local Audubon chapters have coalesced a North Carolina Audubon Council which coordinates activities and communicates information on state issues of common concern. The Council’s highest priorities in 1982 are promotion of legislation to generate funds for nongame wildlife and natural areas conservation, and protection of barrier islands and wetlands from development.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 29 Issue 4, Apr 1982, p12
Record #:
29680
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina is now home to certified Audubon International golf courses. Over a dozen golf courses in the state are part of the organization's Signature and Cooperative Sanctuary program which requires course managers to adopt an environmental management plan, restricting use of fertilizers and clearing, and requiring water quality and conservation measures.
Source:
NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 66 Issue 3, Mar 2008, p28-30, por
Record #:
34585
Author(s):
Abstract:
The purple martin spends their breeding and nesting season in North Carolina and spend the winter in South America. After finding martin houses unattended, the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences teamed up with the Wake Audubon Society to tend to the houses and move them to more desirable locations. The new locations also allow the public to observe the behavior of the purple martins.
Source:
North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 16 Issue 2, Sum 2008, p8-10, il
Record #:
34615
Author(s):
Abstract:
At Prairie Ridge at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, a new roost tower has been built to accommodate thousands of chimney warblers. Just after completion of the tower, birds swifts had already begun to nest inside, encouraging the building of smaller towers around the area.
Source:
North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 23 Issue 4, Fall 2015, p2-3, il