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7 results for Rowan County--History
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Record #:
13855
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Abstract:
Offering histories and statistics relative to the towns comprising Rowan County, Luther Holshouser discusses Salisbury, China Grove, Landis, Rockwell, Cleveland, Woodleaf, Barber, E. Spencer, Gold Hill and Faith.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 20 Issue 45, Apr 1953, p5-7, 25-27, il
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Record #:
21722
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This article examines the temperance movement of antebellum Rowan County from its early beginnings in the late 18th century, to the height of its power in the 1850s, and subsequent collapse by 1860.
Record #:
22365
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Abstract:
This article provides abstracts of eleven historic wills from Rowan County, North Carolina, dating from 1793 up to 1803. Also included is a transcription of the 1781 will of Revolutionary War officer William Lee Davidson.
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Record #:
13854
Author(s):
Abstract:
Home of the Old Catawba and Cherokee Trading Fort on the Yadkin River, Rowan County was settled by Scotch-Irish and German immigrants in the 1740s. Rowan is famous for being the birthplace or home of Griffith Rutherford, Andrew Jackson, General William Davidson, John Brevard, William R. Davie, Daniel Boone, and Alexander Martin.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 20 Issue 45, Apr 1953, p1-3, 16-19, il
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Record #:
27284
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Salisbury is a small town in Rowan County. Food Lion was founded there and the town is also home to Catawba College. In the late twentieth century, early Food Lion investors became millionaires due to the success of the supermarket chain. Many of these investors stayed in Salisbury and invested the money in their community, all the while helping to preserve it.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 84 Issue 5, October 2016, p60, 62, 64, 66, 68-69, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
35684
Author(s):
Abstract:
The past made tactile was defined individually and collectively. The evidence had been excavated in Piedmont counties such as Alexander and Lakes such as High Rock. Tangible proof was represented in artifacts such as arrowheads, pipes, scrapers, and beads.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1978, p9, 54
Record #:
38296
Author(s):
Abstract:
The highway as North Carolina’s colonists knew it was the primary pathway for many. Covering 700 miles from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to August, Georgia, this road largely traveled by foot played a pivotal role in creating some of the state’s metros and major cities. Commemorating the importance of the Great Wagon Road are items in the Rowan Museum such as a wagon made by John Israel Nissen, descendant of original travelers of the road. A personal sign of the road’s importance is on display at the Knox Farm: the rim of one of The Great Wagon’s wheels. John Knox’s eighth generation descendants can’t attest the rim was on their ancestor’s wagon; they only know it’s always been part of the farm’s landscape.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 2, July 2011, p32-34, 36-37 Periodical Website