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14 results for Wise, Jim
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Record #:
7006
Author(s):
Abstract:
Jim Wise, a Durham HERALD-SUN columnist with twenty-three years experience with the paper, was one of the employees escorted off the premises after the newspaper's purchase by the Paxton Group in January 2005. Wise discusses the incident and his long experience with the paper.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 22 Issue 2, Jan 2005, p36-37, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
29230
Author(s):
Abstract:
Tony Seamon’s restaurant Cap’n Tony’s is also Tony’s Sanitary Fish Market and Restaurant in Morehead City, North Carolina. The place was a fish market originally in the 1930s when Tony Seamon was a charter boat skipper. As his fishing charter trips gained popularity, he expanded the market to include a restaurant.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 8, Oct 1980, p38-42, por
Record #:
35677
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hospice, originating during the 19th century, was an idea worth exploring again. A company assuring this type of care could provide death with dignity was Winston-Salem’s Hospice of North Carolina, Inc. How this was possible, according to its director, was being comfortable during one’s remaining time and at peace with the impending end of life.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 4, July/Aug 1978, p7, 42-43
Record #:
35699
Author(s):
Abstract:
A Mountains tours covered a host of interests. History buffs may step back into their favorite time periods in places such as the Farmers Curb Market and Biltmore Homespun Shop. For nature aficionados, there are the Pisgah National Forest and waterfalls. For creative fiction lovers, there were Connemara, Carl Sandburg’s mountain home, and the Flat Rock Playhouse.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 3, May/June 1979, p25
Record #:
35727
Author(s):
Abstract:
Whether interested in natural world or NC’s rich history, Wise asserted the Piedmont region catered to both. Historic sites highlighted included the Reed Gold Mine, site of the first gold discovery in the US; Chinqua-Penn Plantation, which contained art from around the globe; and Bennett Place, reconstructed Civil War site for General Johnson’s surrender to General Sherman. Nature and science lovers could be sated through Mount Morrow State Park; North Carolina Zoo, first state-owned zoo in the US; and Museum of Life and Natural Science, which contained the greatest treasure trove of outer space memorabilia.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 3, May/June 1979, p19, 41
Record #:
35733
Author(s):
Abstract:
Many places to go in NC, proven by the author. Evidence seen in historic towns such as Edenton and Halifax. Examples of historic houses were the House in a Horseshoe and Duke Homestead. Noted historic sites included Connemara and Guildford Courthouse National Military Park. As for outdoor sites of significance, they included Hammocks Beach and Nantahala National Forest.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 3, May/June 1979, p75-76, 79
Record #:
35798
Author(s):
Abstract:
Wise proposed that logs belonged not in a fireplace, but on a homestead. To boost his argument that it was a viable residential alternative, he noted the speed in which a log cabin could be constructed (with modern tools such as a chain saw, it could be built in a month, that is). Added were its virtues as an efficient source of insulation and architectural source of rustic charm.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1979, p
Record #:
35875
Author(s):
Abstract:
The gamut of the Mountain experience, the author asserted was in the touted “heart of the Great Smoky Mountains.” Giving authenticity were descriptions of Soco Gardens Zoo; Meadowbrook Resort; Red Barn Gift Shop; and authentically recreated western town, Ghost Town in the Sky.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 6, Aug 1980, p31-33
Record #:
35843
Author(s):
Abstract:
Solar power was a commonly perceived power source of the future. The author proved it was an energy source of the ages—harnessed as far back as antiquity, in fact. To prove it a feasible solution for the current energy crisis, he discussed the facility of active and passive solar power. He also proposed how homes could be retrofitted, or equipped, to generate this type of power.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 2, Mar 1980, p23-26, 55-56, 58
Record #:
35870
Author(s):
Abstract:
A popular vacation spot for people from both sides of the Mason-Dixon Line, the Outer Banks retained a mystique. This quality, Wise claims the other area noted, the Mountains, lacks. He noted it as an irony: the Mountains have retained a claim to the past that granted it legend status.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 6, Aug 1980, p13
Record #:
35845
Author(s):
Abstract:
For recreation, rest, and resort like residency, the author proposed resorting to Wolf Laurel, Foxfire, and Bald Island. The mountains’ Wolf Laurel offered horseback riding and hiking. For golfers, the Highlands’ Foxfire offered outings galore on the green. Bald Island offered lovers of the great outdoors acreage of palm trees and evidence (at least tracks) of wildlife like cougars.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 2, Mar 1980, p31-32, 46
Record #:
35877
Author(s):
Abstract:
The town boasting of lagoons and wildlife, sand dunes and woods, had existed less than forty years. No less important than one existing a little less than four hundred years (Roanoke) was town incorporated the year prior, though. The author proved its lack of gaudiness, found in other resort towns, offered Southern Shores equitable allure to vacationers and NC residents alike.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 6, Aug 1980, p38-39
Record #:
35908
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mentioned was Smoke to Gold, a book produced by a local junior historic club, the Skewarkians. Getting the spotlight, though, was their second literary endeavor, Weird Tales. Many of the tales told were the byproduct of club members interviewing residents of Martin County, living in towns like Bear Grass. Helping the book to live up to its name and claim were ghost stories, local superstitions, and folk medicine.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 8, Oct 1980, p16
Record #:
35919
Author(s):
Abstract:
April was known for two Durham County anniversaries, one being the 116th anniversary of General Joseph Johnston’s surrender to General William Sherman. The latter event appears to have generated only loss, but the author proved otherwise. Noted was Union soldiers camping near Bennett Place planted a seed of demand for its bright leaf tobacco. Wealth generated from the demand yielded the relocation of Trinity College to Durham. From an endowment by James B. Duke came the transformation of Trinity College into Duke University.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 9 Issue 4, Apr 1981, p64