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8 results for Nantahala National Forest
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Record #:
2005
Author(s):
Abstract:
Logging interests and conservation groups dispute the best way to manage over a million acres of Western North Carolina's Pisgah and Nantahala National forests.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 42 Issue 4, Fall 1994, p2-6, il
Record #:
23774
Abstract:
Nantahala Gorge in the Great Smokey Mountains National Park has long been a mecca for outdoor activities.
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Record #:
29203
Author(s):
Abstract:
Panthertown Valley, nestled between the resort towns in Jackson and Macon counties, North Carolina is a scenic and ecological wonderland with cliffs and valleys, harbors and headways, endangered species and trout streams. The natural marvels of Panthertown Valley are under the watchful eye of North Carolina's chapter of the Nature Conservancy, and with the cooperation of the Duke Energy Company has been added to the Nantahala National Forest.
Source:
NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 49 Issue 4, April 1991, p52-54, 56, 60, por
Record #:
32395
Author(s):
Abstract:
Author Carl Sink outlines a wide variety of things to do and see in the mountains of North Carolina in the spring and summer of 1948. Dozens of new sites and activities have been added with an increase in motel accommodations, road improvements and increased access to natural areas.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 15 Issue 48, May 1948, p3-4, il
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Record #:
34722
Author(s):
Abstract:
Approximately half of the public hunting land in North Carolina is located in Pisgah and Nantahala National Forests in western NC. However, since the 1990’s, there has been a drastic decline in animal species in this area, leading hunters and fishermen to voice their conservation concerns with the U.S. Forest Service. The Brushy Ridge project has allowed for conversations to be held between several stakeholder groups to determine the best conservation strategies to repair the damage to these national forests
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Record #:
35733
Author(s):
Abstract:
Many places to go in NC, proven by the author. Evidence seen in historic towns such as Edenton and Halifax. Examples of historic houses were the House in a Horseshoe and Duke Homestead. Noted historic sites included Connemara and Guildford Courthouse National Military Park. As for outdoor sites of significance, they included Hammocks Beach and Nantahala National Forest.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 3, May/June 1979, p75-76, 79
Record #:
35920
Author(s):
Abstract:
Whether novice or expert, any visitor could venture the great outdoors from mountains to coast. Watercraft activities included canoeing in Chowan River and whitewater rafting in the Ocoee River. Adventure could be found in forests such as Nantahala through hiking and backpacking. For those mountain trekkers, there was horseback riding through the Great Smokies and rock climbing on Shortoff. Coastal Plain adventures included bicycling along the Manteo to Murphy stretch and hand gliding off of Jockey’s Ridge.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 9 Issue 5, May 1981, p49-52, 62
Record #:
38254
Author(s):
Abstract:
Benton MacKaye’s efforts to beautify the area blighted by excessive lumbering and erosion generated the creation of a trail that today covers 2,000 miles and runs through fourteen states. The alliance of volunteer hiking clubs and what became known as the Appalachian Trail Conservancy yielded the trail completed in 1937. Today, groups such as the Southern Appalachian Highlands Conservancy help to upkeep the trails and surround region, along with minimizing activities like logging and development.
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