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15 results for Pisgah National Forest
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Record #:
2005
Author(s):
Abstract:
Logging interests and conservation groups dispute the best way to manage over a million acres of Western North Carolina's Pisgah and Nantahala National forests.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 42 Issue 4, Fall 1994, p2-6, il
Record #:
5367
Author(s):
Abstract:
Most people remember George Vanderbilt as the builder of Biltmore Estate near Asheville. Less well-known is his influence on forest management in the nation. Surrounding his home were 125,000 acres of forest which he named Pisgah. Vanderbilt was determined that his woods would not be subject to a \"cut down and move on\" policy prevalent in the nation at that time. Ellis discusses Vanderbilt's vision of well-managed forests.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 70 Issue 4, Sept 2002, p146-150, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
9945
Author(s):
Abstract:
The U.S. Forest Service is spending more than $200,000 to improve visitor accommodations at the Pisgah National Forest's Sliding Rock. Planned improvements include new dressing and shower rooms, three layers of observation decks, and a parking lot for fifty cars. The natural waterslide, which is a few miles south of the Blue Ridge Parkway, has attracted visitors for as long as anyone can remember and its popularity has recently increased many times over with the airing of a Lassie television show that featured the famous collie taking a trip down the slippery rock.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 40 Issue 16, Feb 1973, p17-18, il, map
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Record #:
11699
Abstract:
One of the eleven divisions comprising the North Carolina National Forests, Pisgah became the first large tract of forest land in the country. Occupying some 105,887 acres of land purchased by the National Forest Service, Pisgah became the first established game preserve east of the Mississippi. \r\n
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 32 Issue 7, Aug 1964, p11, 22, il
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Record #:
14416
Author(s):
Abstract:
National Park and Forest officials have completed arrangements for the public to get an unobstructed view of the most colorful show on earth this fall, from the top of America. The five-mile section of the Blue Ridge Parkway on Pisgah Mountain will be opened to the public for the first time since the war.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 15 Issue 19, Oct 1947, p9, f
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Record #:
22791
Author(s):
Abstract:
Canyoneering is a popular activity in the western United States, but in the past decade, Joe Moerschbaecher, has developed a Brevard-based adventure guiding company that specializes in the sport. Pura Vida Adventures offers a unique experience for the adventurous tourist in the heart of North Carolina waterfall and gorge country.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 8, January 2015, p142-146, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
23643
Abstract:
In Pisgah National Forest, llamas do the heavy lifting, helping hikers carry camping gear through the trails.
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Record #:
23770
Author(s):
Abstract:
Art Loeb's love for hiking in Western North Carolina was the driving force behind the dedication of a 30 mile footpath bisected by the Blue Ridge Parkway, the Art Loeb Trail.
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Record #:
23819
Abstract:
The author discusses his experience mountain biking on a unicycle in Pisgah National Forest.
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Record #:
26443
Author(s):
Abstract:
In an attempt to prevent the private purchase of nearly 40,000 acres of game land for non-game use in the Pisgah National Forest, the NC Wildlife Federation is asking the public to write the North Carolina Congress to prevent this activity.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 24 Issue (27) 5, May 1980, p4
Record #:
32395
Author(s):
Abstract:
Author Carl Sink outlines a wide variety of things to do and see in the mountains of North Carolina in the spring and summer of 1948. Dozens of new sites and activities have been added with an increase in motel accommodations, road improvements and increased access to natural areas.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 15 Issue 48, May 1948, p3-4, il
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Record #:
34722
Author(s):
Abstract:
Approximately half of the public hunting land in North Carolina is located in Pisgah and Nantahala National Forests in western NC. However, since the 1990’s, there has been a drastic decline in animal species in this area, leading hunters and fishermen to voice their conservation concerns with the U.S. Forest Service. The Brushy Ridge project has allowed for conversations to be held between several stakeholder groups to determine the best conservation strategies to repair the damage to these national forests
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Record #:
34962
Abstract:
Before modern technology, the only way to detect a wildfire was to watch from a tower. Many of these forestry towers, though not in use, are still standing and have become an integral part of Western North Carolina hiking trails. Fryingpan Mountain Lookout Tower, located near Pisgah National Forest, is the tallest in the Western half of the state.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 5, October 2017, p152-160, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
35699
Author(s):
Abstract:
A Mountains tours covered a host of interests. History buffs may step back into their favorite time periods in places such as the Farmers Curb Market and Biltmore Homespun Shop. For nature aficionados, there are the Pisgah National Forest and waterfalls. For creative fiction lovers, there were Connemara, Carl Sandburg’s mountain home, and the Flat Rock Playhouse.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 3, May/June 1979, p25
Record #:
35770
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Mountains were a valuable part of NC, the author proclaimed, initially measuring this value in the types of precious stones to be found in ranges such as Pisgah. Discussed later was their greatest source of wealth—the people. Such people included those there before the arrival of English settlers, such as the Cherokee. Such people included the generations of immigrants and present day resident of Appalachia. The author concluded that collectively they helped to make the area what it became.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 5, Sept 1979, p27-28,45