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24 results for Duke Energy Corp. (Durham)
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Record #:
7299
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David Hauser, who has worked for Duke Energy Corp. for thirty-one years, was named the company's chief financial officer in February 2004. Hauser started with what was then Duke Power in 1973 as an accountant. He was named comptroller in 1987 and was senior vice-president and treasurer before assuming his present position.
Record #:
13862
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When the merger of Progress Energy and Duke Energy is completed later in 2011, it will create the country's largest utility. This article presents a capsule view of what the merger will look like.
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Record #:
15536
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The merger of Duke Energy and Progress Energy will create the nation's largest utility company and scheduled completion is slated for December 31. Merger progress was slowed on September 30th when the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission requested additional information about concerns of competition for customers.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 28 Issue 41, Oct 2011, p5,9 Periodical Website
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Record #:
17110
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Duke Energy Corporation merged with Progress Energy earlier this year but has already fired CEO Bill Johnson. This along with recently divulged industry secrets leads some skeptics to believe the goal of the merger is not to pass savings onto customers but enhance the company's ability to pursue nuclear facilities.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 29 Issue 30, July 2012, p5, 11, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
17332
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The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission will issue two accounts of code violations by Shearon Harris Nuclear Plant, a facility operated by Duke Energy. The plant, located in New Hill, and its practices will be addressed by an enforcement conference in Atlanta on August 24, a meeting prompted by members of the Republican National Convention.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 29 Issue 34, Aug 2012, p7 Periodical Website
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Record #:
19486
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Jim Rogers spent 25 years  building a reputation as a forward thinking, civic minded coal baron, but with Duke's merger with Progress Energy, Rogers is retiring at the height of his career.
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Record #:
21840
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On February 2, 2014, a storage pond at a retired Duke Energy coal-fired power plant in Eden poured over 2.35 million gallons of toxic water and about 39,000 tons of coal ash into the Dan River. It was the third-largest coal-ash spill in the nation's history. Martin recounts events before and after the spill. A map locates the fourteen sites where Duke Energy stores 106 million tons of coal-ash; some plants are active and some are retired. Cleaning up the coal-ash ponds could cost customers over $1 billion.
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Record #:
22054
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On February 2, 2014, a storage pond at a retired Duke Energy coal-fired power plant in Eden poured over 2.35 million gallons of toxic water and about 39,000 tons of coal ash into the Dan River--the third-largest coal-ash spill in the nation's history. A complicating factor in the fallout following the spill is that Governor Pat McCrory worked thirty years for the company that caused the spill. Mooneyham speculates how this will affect the race for Governor in 2016.
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Record #:
22191
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\"The North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources knew since last August (2013) that Duke Energy was illegally polluting the Dan River with coal ash, yet the agency did nothing about it.\" That proved disastrous when in February 2014 it was discovered that the ash pond at Duke Energy's Eden retired plant, was leaking 30,000-39,000 tons of coal ash and other contaminants into the river. The disaster has come under federal investigation, although the details have not been released. \"It is thought that the probe will focus on how DENR used the federal Clean Water Act to run interference for Duke Energy.\"
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 31 Issue 8, Feb 2014, p7-9, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
22190
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On February 2, a retired coal plant, operated by Duke Energy in Eden, began leaking approximately 30,000 tons of toxic coal ash into the Dan River. It was the third largest of its kind in the country's history. The river, a vital drinking source for Virginia and North Carolina towns, may have been polluted with heavy metals such as arsenic. Ball reports on a February meeting of the NC Genial Assembly's Environmental Review Commission. Among the points raised was the question--\"Who is going to pay for the cleanup?\" A complicating factor in the fallout following the spill is that Governor Pat McCrory worked thirty years for the company that caused the spill.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 31 Issue 8, Feb 2014, p8-9 Periodical Website
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Record #:
22262
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Duke Energy has stated that it will pay for the coal ash spill into the Dan River at its site in Eden. However, its president and CEO have indicated that they expect consumers to pay for the cleanup of the other coal ash sites around the state which means that electric rates will rise. The price tag for this is between $2 and $10 billion. A concern is that many regulators who have the responsibility of answering that question of who pays have ties to the utility industry.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 31 Issue 18, Apr 2014, p15-17, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
23046
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Duke Energy pled guilty for nine misdemeanor violations of the federal Clean Water Act in May 2015. In prior months, the company dumped 39,000 tons of ash in the Dan River, causing Duke Energy to come under scrutiny.
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Record #:
23169
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North Carolina residents in Lee County oppose Duke Energy's plan to dispose of potentially carcinogenic ash in abandoned brick mines.
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Record #:
23204
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Duke Energy has a monopoly on power in North Carolina and pushes for offshore drilling, but many residents hope solar power is in the near future, if Duke Energy does not push against solar power. Perhaps it is best to break Duke Energy's stronghold on energy in North Carolina.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 32 Issue 12, March 2015, p10, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
24266
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In February of 2014, a pipe at Duke Energy's retired Eden coal plant ruptured into the Dan River, polluting the water with toxic coal ash, arsenic, and cadmium. The company originally faced a fine of $25 million, but recently the N.C. Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) privately negotiated with Duke Energy and cut the fine to $7 million.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 32 Issue 40, October 2015, p7, 9, il Periodical Website
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