NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


8 results for Coal-ash spills--Eden
Currently viewing results 1 - 8
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
21840
Author(s):
Abstract:
On February 2, 2014, a storage pond at a retired Duke Energy coal-fired power plant in Eden poured over 2.35 million gallons of toxic water and about 39,000 tons of coal ash into the Dan River. It was the third-largest coal-ash spill in the nation's history. Martin recounts events before and after the spill. A map locates the fourteen sites where Duke Energy stores 106 million tons of coal-ash; some plants are active and some are retired. Cleaning up the coal-ash ponds could cost customers over $1 billion.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
22054
Author(s):
Abstract:
On February 2, 2014, a storage pond at a retired Duke Energy coal-fired power plant in Eden poured over 2.35 million gallons of toxic water and about 39,000 tons of coal ash into the Dan River--the third-largest coal-ash spill in the nation's history. A complicating factor in the fallout following the spill is that Governor Pat McCrory worked thirty years for the company that caused the spill. Mooneyham speculates how this will affect the race for Governor in 2016.
Full Text:
Record #:
22191
Abstract:
\"The North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources knew since last August (2013) that Duke Energy was illegally polluting the Dan River with coal ash, yet the agency did nothing about it.\" That proved disastrous when in February 2014 it was discovered that the ash pond at Duke Energy's Eden retired plant, was leaking 30,000-39,000 tons of coal ash and other contaminants into the river. The disaster has come under federal investigation, although the details have not been released. \"It is thought that the probe will focus on how DENR used the federal Clean Water Act to run interference for Duke Energy.\"
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 31 Issue 8, Feb 2014, p7-9, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
22190
Author(s):
Abstract:
On February 2, a retired coal plant, operated by Duke Energy in Eden, began leaking approximately 30,000 tons of toxic coal ash into the Dan River. It was the third largest of its kind in the country's history. The river, a vital drinking source for Virginia and North Carolina towns, may have been polluted with heavy metals such as arsenic. Ball reports on a February meeting of the NC Genial Assembly's Environmental Review Commission. Among the points raised was the question--\"Who is going to pay for the cleanup?\" A complicating factor in the fallout following the spill is that Governor Pat McCrory worked thirty years for the company that caused the spill.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 31 Issue 8, Feb 2014, p8-9 Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
22262
Author(s):
Abstract:
Duke Energy has stated that it will pay for the coal ash spill into the Dan River at its site in Eden. However, its president and CEO have indicated that they expect consumers to pay for the cleanup of the other coal ash sites around the state which means that electric rates will rise. The price tag for this is between $2 and $10 billion. A concern is that many regulators who have the responsibility of answering that question of who pays have ties to the utility industry.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 31 Issue 18, Apr 2014, p15-17, il, por, map Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
24490
Author(s):
Abstract:
Duke Energy’s current Chief Executive Officer, Lynn Good, assumed her role in the summer of 2013. Seven months into the job, she faced the Dan River crisis, and rose to the occasion. She has demonstrated her ability to oversee the coal-ash crisis and now she moves forward with planning the company’s future.
Full Text:
Record #:
27587
Abstract:
The North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) knew that Duke Energy was polluting the Dan River and did nothing to stop it. The DENR and Duke Energy are now under federal investigation. Observers believe the DENR let the spill go as it is the EPA’s job to enforce clean water regulations, but the agency prevented citizen groups from suing Duke Energy. Some argue that this protected Duke Energy while putting citizens and the environment at risk.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 31 Issue 9, Feb 2014, p7-9 Periodical Website
Record #:
31446
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 2014, a ruptured pipe spilled as much as 39,000 tons of coal ash into the Dan River in Eden, NC. This article provides an update on Duke Energy’s progress on the cleanup.
Source: