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6 results for Franklin--Description and travel
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Record #:
8716
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Abstract:
Franklin, the county seat of Macon County, celebrated its 150th anniversary in 2005. The town is nicknamed the “gem capital of the world” and is well-known for the mining of rubies and sapphires. Visitors to the town can enjoy a thriving downtown; museums, including the Franklin Gem and Mineral Museum, the Scottish Tartans Museum, and the Macon County Historical Society and Museum; and natural surroundings that include over 150,000 acres of the Nantahala National Forest and part of the Appalachian Trail.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 10, Mar 2007, p20-22, 24, 26, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
8965
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Abstract:
Meadowlark Gliderport recently opened in Franklinton, bringing gliding to Franklin County. Owned and operated by Dr. William Via of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's School of Dentistry, the gliders are launched from the ground using an engine-powered winch. Depending on air currents, glide times range from five minutes to forty-five minutes. Via hopes to employee a certified glider flight instructor in the near future.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 5, Oct 1978, p20-22, il
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Record #:
24657
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Abstract:
This article serves as a guide for tourists who wish to travel to the Sapphire Country in southwestern North Carolina and focuses on cities such as Hendersonville, Tryon, Brevard, and Franklin.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 25 Issue 2, June 1957, p20-25, il
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Record #:
35723
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Abstract:
For rock enthusiasts, this article contained gems of the information. Examples are mother lode level locations such as Spruce Pine, Franklin, Little Switzerland, a facility to discover more areas of interest (Museum of North Carolina Minerals), and number of minerals that can be found in the Tar Heel State (over three hundred, in comparison to ten that can be found in other states).
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 3, May/June 1979, p30-31
Record #:
36968
Author(s):
Abstract:
Profile was that year’s solar eclipse, a total solar eclipse in history touted as viewable in towns such as Franklin, Sylva, and Highlands. Included in the profile were other contributions that western North Carolina has made to the field of astronomy. In the early 1960s, NASA established a satellite tracking station in Transylvania County, now called the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute. That institute became a site of research for this eclipse.
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Record #:
36576
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mounds built by Native Americans, like the ones featured in the accompanying photo, had purposes both prosaic and sacred. Places like Franklin, Bryson City, Murphy have earthen mounds intact, despite the effects of erosion, plowing, and artifact hunters.