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12 results for Horticulture
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Record #:
7782
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Kim Powell planned to retire in 2005 after thirty-plus years of service with Agricultural Extension and the Department of Horticultural Science at N.C. State University. Along with his teaching duties, he had been directly responsible for all Agricultural Extension professionals statewide. He had also hosted the UNC-TV show 'The Backyard Gardner' and a weekly call-in radio show on gardening. However, his retirement was delayed when he was asked to fill in as interim director of the J. C. Raulston Arboretum while a search was undertaken for a new director. The position was filled in December 2005.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 11, Apr 2006, p144-146, 148-149, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
27907
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A horticulturist discusses growing raspberries in North Carolina. The horticulturist discovered an heirloom variety cultivated by Jack Carpenter in Winston-Salem. The variety was very popular, but hard to find, so Hyman decided to grow the plant on his own and sell them. Hyman discusses what makes a good variety, how it grows in North Carolina, and the challenges gardeners face from the weather.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 15, April 2010, p37 Periodical Website
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Record #:
27985
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Large patches of red spider lilies (Lycoris radiata) bloom all around New Bern in mid-September. The lilies were first planted by the Roberts family, and the progeny of the lilies has spread throughout the southeast. In order to grow red spider lilies, horticulturalists should consider several cautionary facts regarding its growing zone.
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Record #:
28533
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The American Chestnut Foundation is working to restore the chestnut tree to America. The conditions for the tree’s disappearance are detailed along with the foundation's breeding program. The foundation is breeding hybrid chestnut trees and has had some success. Their work and their mission are described.
Record #:
29139
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Bryce Lane has three Emmys to prove his garden is a star. His garden is featured on the weekly show, In the Garden with Bryce Lane, on UNC-TV public broadcasting for North Carolina. As a former professor in the NC State University Department of Horticultural Science, Lane as a way with making complex concepts seems easy. Now he is sharing his knowledge teaching short term classes at the JC Raulston Arboretum.
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Record #:
29571
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Joseph Hillenmeyer, a garden and landscape designer in Kentucky, created a garden complex for Leon and Sandy Hollon. The garden complex is a living record of neighborly and familial ties, and features eight rooms that reflect the Hollons’ admiration for formal European style. Hillenmeyer’s work has gained popularity, leading him to new projects in North Carolina.
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Record #:
29797
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Every year the Blue Ridge Horticultural Association hosts the Growing in the Mountains Spring Plant Sale. A variety of people come to the sale to buy local products, and to talk about plants and gardening. Local nurseries and growers attest to the importance of maintaining a close-knit community.
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Record #:
34381
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Brothers Tim and Matt Nichols run one of the largest Japanese maple tree operations in the country, propagating and shipping more than one-thousand cultivars. Their business, Mr. Maple nursery, is located in East Flat Rock, Henderson County. In addition to the maples, the Nichols brothers grow nearly five-hundred other kinds of woody ornamental shrubs, including varieties of ginkgo trees and dawn redwoods.
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Record #:
36589
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Sharing genetic material with the Scutellata, the bees Sean Collingsworth keeps are the Italian and Carniolan varieties. His relatively harmless hive dwellers, supping on nectar untainted by pesticides, produce what he touted as honey high in quality because of its purity.
Record #:
36586
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Touted as an advantage for homeschooling was developing a connection with nature by learning skills such as growing produce and animal husbandry. Reasons noted for homeschooling included children possessing gifts or challenges traditional schooling is unequipped to handle. While adhering to the state’s core curriculum and assessments, it utilizes teaching methods aligning with learning styles and interests and prioritize mastery over grades. Local support for homeschooled children includes Asheville Arboretum’s EXPLORE and Earthaven Ecovillage.
Record #:
36585
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The movement encouraging a deeper connection to and respect for nature has generated the combination of agriculture and neighborhoods. The profile agrihood, Olivette, facilitates eco-sensitive practices such as permaculture to protect existing species and promote responsible stewardship of the land.
Record #:
36576
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Abstract:
Mounds built by Native Americans, like the ones featured in the accompanying photo, had purposes both prosaic and sacred. Places like Franklin, Bryson City, Murphy have earthen mounds intact, despite the effects of erosion, plowing, and artifact hunters.