NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


10 results for Zoos
Currently viewing results 1 - 10
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
15486
Author(s):
Abstract:
A 1930s phenomenon was roadside convenient stores adding animals as attractions to draw in more patrons. Many gas station owners captured bears to chain by the side of the road to entice the passer-by to stop and give them some business. One brave gas station owner in Valdese purchased a lioness from the circus and kept her caged on the roadside.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 17, Sept 1935, p7
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
24473
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Zoological Park pays tribute to Africa by hosting animals such as lions, giraffes, and rhinoceros. The zoo is a natural habitat zoo, which means the animals are kept in surroundings similar to the ones they inhabit in the wild. It is the first and second-largest natural-habitat zoo in the world.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 59 Issue 5, October 1991, p29-32, il
Full Text:
Record #:
24852
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Livermon Park and Mini-zoo in Windsor, North Carolina has made some new additions to their park. The park itself has new upgrades and the mini-zoo boasts a new zebra. The park is considered by many to be an excellent spot for summer picnics, kayaking, canoeing, hiking, and much more.
Record #:
26026
Author(s):
Abstract:
Wildlife habitat conservation is key to species conservation; however, more habitats are being destroyed from deforestation and development. Conservation strategies are turning to zoos to provide appropriate habitat and resources for various species.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 20 Issue 3, Summer 1976, p21, il
Record #:
30654
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Piedmont and Mountain regions of North Carolina provide plenty of opportunities to observe wild animals. Some places to enjoy animals are the Lazy 5 Ranch, Tiger World, Western North Carolina Nature Center, Carolina Raptor Center, and the North Carolina Zoo. This article provides a description of each of these five locations.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 46 Issue 4, Apr 2014, p42-43, il, por, map Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
35680
Abstract:
Touted also as the first total, natural habitat zoo, it included animals representing all seven continents, terrestrial or aquatic. What made this zoo possible: its location near Asheboro; financial backers such as the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation; a growing public support base through the Zoological Society; and thirteen zookeepers passionate about their work.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 4, July/Aug 1978, p24-26
Record #:
36968
Author(s):
Abstract:
Profile was that year’s solar eclipse, a total solar eclipse in history touted as viewable in towns such as Franklin, Sylva, and Highlands. Included in the profile were other contributions that western North Carolina has made to the field of astronomy. In the early 1960s, NASA established a satellite tracking station in Transylvania County, now called the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute. That institute became a site of research for this eclipse.
Source:
Record #:
35875
Author(s):
Abstract:
The gamut of the Mountain experience, the author asserted was in the touted “heart of the Great Smoky Mountains.” Giving authenticity were descriptions of Soco Gardens Zoo; Meadowbrook Resort; Red Barn Gift Shop; and authentically recreated western town, Ghost Town in the Sky.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 6, Aug 1980, p31-33
Record #:
38243
Author(s):
Abstract:
Tiger World, housing the expected tigers, includes lions, bears, otters, wallabies, and parrots among its animals rescued from places like shut down zoos. The wildlife refuge in Rowan County, welcoming over 100,000 visitors annually, relies on corporate donations and volunteers for daily operation and care of its animals, numbering over 110 and representing 54 species.
Record #:
38755
Author(s):
Abstract:
Two young raccoons were rescued from law violators who killed their mother and chopped down their den tree. The raccoons we relocated to a children’s zoo, where they will remain.
Subject(s):