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23 results for Payne, Peggy
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Record #:
344
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The North Carolina Arts Council and the North Carolina Department of Community Colleges combined to create the Visiting Artist Program, which brings artists of all mediums and cultures to different community colleges in the state.
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NC Insight (NoCar JK 4101 .N3x), Vol. 5 Issue 4, Feb 1983, p60-61, il
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Record #:
8592
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Founded in 1753, the town of Portsmouth on the Outer Banks was a lively place of 505 people. Shipping was an important activity because inbound ships were stopped by the shallow waters and had to unload cargo at Portsmouth into smaller, shallow-draft vessels that could carry it across to the mainland. Activity in the town reached a peak in the mid-19th-century, afterward declined because of hurricanes, channels that filled with sand, and shipping activities falling off. By the early 1970s, the last residents had departed. All that remains of the town are 20 structures, including a post office, church, a schoolhouse, and several cemeteries.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 8 Issue 2, Feb 1976, p7-9, il, map Periodical Website
Record #:
9378
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Antebellum medicinal prescriptions relied heavily on the use of whiskey and herbs. Some treatments such as bleeding with leeches and gashing and cupping seemed less desirable than the malady. Miracle Cures and elixirs and odd practices used by the clergy seem ludicrous and far-fetched by today's standards.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 7, Dec 1974, p16-18, 34, il
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Record #:
9672
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Payne describes poisonous plants to avoid when enjoying the out-of-doors. These include poison ivy, buttercup, cow-itch vine, and Jack-in-the Pulpit.
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Record #:
9540
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Stretching across the Atlantic Coastal Plain from Florida to New Jersey are around 500,000 elliptical depressions known as Carolina Bays. Over half of them are found in eastern Carolina, and they are a land feature that exists nowhere else in the world. No one knows how they were formed.
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Record #:
9630
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Many of the state's native plants have medicinal benefits and are often used to produce commercial drugs. Among them are bloodroot, yellow lady slipper, and mayapple.
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Record #:
9637
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Robert Ruark grew up in Wilmington, and at the time of his death in 1965 was one of the country's best-known writers, being a columnist, best-selling novelist, and screen writer. Some of his most-remembered work is a series of tales about a boy and an old man hunting and fishing together around the coastal village of Southport.
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Record #:
9632
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There are a number of treeless mountain meadows, called “balds,” scattered throughout the western North Carolina mountains. Some are covered with flowering bushes and others are grasslands. Payne discusses some of the theories about their origins.
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Record #:
28884
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Controversies over public art are political and involve questions about what is considered art. Debates have been raised over public sculptures in Raleigh and sign ordinances in Asheville.
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NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 3 Issue 2, Feb 1987, p2-3, por
Record #:
28935
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The General Assembly voted, after some confusion, to establish the North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics. The state high school will focus on the intensive study of science and mathematics. Durham, Charlotte, and Raleigh have expressed interest in providing a home for the school.
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NC Insight (NoCar JK 4101 .N3x), Vol. 1 Issue 4, Fall 1978, p8-11
Record #:
29113
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Skiing has become a popular winter sport and industry in North Carolina. Ten new ski resorts are opening slopes in the northwestern part of the state. There has also been an increase in the number of ski shops, night skiing, competitions, and upgraded snow-making capabilities.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1978, p34-37, il, por
Record #:
29270
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Abstract:
William Tryon, fourth royal governor of North Carolina, sent numerous handwritten letters to his family in England. The letters described plans for a Newbern Villa, the bilious disorder of his stomach, and his two-month trip exploring the region he was to govern from 1765 to 1771.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 9 Issue 1, Jan 1981, p38-41, por, map
Record #:
29294
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Abstract:
A kind of financial censorship is beginning to restrict access to materials that libraries in North Carolina can no longer afford to buy. Academic libraries, which must buy costly research materials and journals, are particularly threatened by inflated prices. Libraries in the University of North Carolina system have had to cancel subscriptions to academic journals, or request funds from other institutions.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 9 Issue 3, Mar 1981, p21-23, il
Record #:
29297
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Three North Carolina ski instructors were selected to attend a week-long skiing event in the Austrian Tyrol. Austrians helped to develop the first American ski resorts and schools, including several in western North Carolina. The point of the event was a reaffirmation of the Austrian roots of American skiing.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 9 Issue 3, Mar 1981, p38-41, por
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Record #:
31627
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Square dancing is still popular in North Carolina, with over one-hundred Western square dance clubs in the state. This article discusses various forms of square dancing, such as clogging and smooth dancing. A well-known dance resort is at Fontana Village, which offers workshops and training for callers.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 8 Issue 9, Sept 1976, p8-9, il, por Periodical Website