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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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39 results for Community colleges
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Record #:
344
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The North Carolina Arts Council and the North Carolina Department of Community Colleges combined to create the Visiting Artist Program, which brings artists of all mediums and cultures to different community colleges in the state.
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NC Insight (NoCar JK 4101 .N3x), Vol. 5 Issue 4, Feb 1983, p60-61, il
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Record #:
521
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The community college system has made a major impact on the citizens and the economy of North Carolina.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 55 Issue 4, Spring 1990, p2-12, il, bibl, f
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Record #:
569
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Rising tuition at North Carolina's community colleges may be closing doors to an increasing population of students who are trying to increase their marketable skills.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 49 Issue 9, Sept 1991, p28-30, il
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Record #:
1649
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After eleven years at the helm of the North Carolina Community College System, former governor Bob Scott is retiring.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 52 Issue 6, June 1994, p14-15, il
Record #:
1876
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Former governor Bob Scott is ending his 11-year tenure as head of the community college system. Scott's advocacy has been an invaluable part of making the state's community college system a model for the nation.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 52 Issue 9, Sept 1994, p44-46, il
Record #:
1875
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Despite the passage of a first-ever funding referendum, some state community colleges, mostly ones in rural areas, are struggling to raise the required matching funds.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 52 Issue 9, Sept 1994, p40-43, 47-50, il
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Record #:
2413
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Lloyd V. Hackley is the new president of the North Carolina Community College System. His goal is to get K-12 schools and two- and four-year colleges to coordinate their efforts to produce a literate, job-ready workforce.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 53 Issue 7, July 1995, p10,12-13, il
Record #:
3833
Author(s):
Abstract:
Martin Lancaster was appointed president of the North Carolina Community College System in 1997. His background as a state representative and U.S. Congressman provides good experience in dealing with the General Assembly in matters of funding to improve the system's out-dated equipment and to boost teacher salaries.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 56 Issue 9, Sept 1998, p8,10-11, por
Record #:
5901
Abstract:
In 1963, the North Carolina General Assembly created a statewide community college system. Today the system has become a model for the nation and is rivaled only by those in California and Texas. Around 800,000 students are enrolled across the state.
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Subject(s):
Record #:
6855
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The North Carolina Community College System is the country's third largest. Around 800,000 students are served by 58 colleges with more than 100 campuses. Not only does the system provide citizens with basic skills for the workplace, it also makes available and provides higher education instruction. Gimpel highlights a number of the colleges and an offered specialty that is determined by the school's location: Brunswick Community College (aquaculture); Sandhills Community College (golf course management); and Surry Community College (grape cultivation and wine making).
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 4, Sept 2004, p86-90, 92, 94-95, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7385
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North Carolina's fifty-eight community colleges prepare workers for jobs in existing industries and for the jobs of the future. There is a campus practically within a thirty-minute drive of every state citizen. The community college system had 158,000 students enrolled in distance learning programs in 2004, and another 800,000 students took at least one course on campus. Maurer discusses some of the more unusual course offerings, including aquaculture and marine science, aviation, court reporting and captioning, crime scene investigation, cyberscience investigation, culinary technology and hospitality, and nanotechnology.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 9, Sept 2005, p54, 56-64, 66-67, il
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Record #:
11818
Abstract:
Larry J. Blake became president of the North Carolina Department of Community Colleges on July 1, 1979. He had previously served as a community college president in British Columbia.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 37 Issue 9, Sept 1979, p16-17, 54-55, il, por
Record #:
18740
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Abstract:
The state's community college system was developed in the 1960s by W. Dallas Herring, former Chairman of the State Board of Education. By 2008, changing economic dynamics prompted a reevaluation of the system and how to meet the state's educational, and ultimately employment, needs. The author assesses what he determined to be four critical areas of concern faced by community colleges (\"nontraditional\" students, completion rates, work force shortage, and lack of infrastructure for students) and how to overcome these issues to create a more productive system and better educated and qualified workforce for the state.
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Record #:
18760
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Historically, the community college system developed to provide the state with a qualified work-force to fill manufacturing jobs beginning with Buncombe County Junior College in 1928. Having been organized into a state-wide system in 1963 under the Community College Act, this network of institutions faced contemporary problems of changing economic demands throughout the early 2000s. The author presents the history of the community college system to try and anticipate how this institution will need to adapt to future developments within the state's evolving economy.
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Record #:
18762
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The article reviews the diverse student population served by community colleges with a statistical breakdown of enrolled students by age, race, part-time or full-time. Compared with the University of North Carolina system, community college students can be qualified as 'non-traditional' and working students. Trends within the enrollments in the community college system reflect diversifying demographics for the entire state.
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