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26 results for Maurer, Allan
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Record #:
6954
Author(s):
Abstract:
Electronic waste is a product of rapid turnover in computer technology. IBM's Asset Recovery Center in Raleigh recycles computer equipment donated by individuals who receive payment for their contributions. Around 2,000 computers are handled daily by the 650 employees. In 2003, the center processed over 560,000 PCs and sold $1.5 billion of certified used equipment.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 62 Issue 12, Dec 2004, p6, il
Record #:
7048
Author(s):
Abstract:
Maurer discusses Cary's growth as a center for amateur sports in the state and nation. The state amateur games are scheduled there for 2005 and 2006. Over 12,000 athletes and coaches will come, plus hordes of spectators. USA Baseball is opening four fields in Cary to train players for the World Cup, Pan Am, and Olympic games in 2008. Other sports facilities and events include the SAS Soccer Park, the thirty-court Cary Tennis Center, the Jimmy V Celebrity Golf Classic, and cross-country running courses. Sporting activities have a huge impact on the city's economy, attracting people to hotels, shopping centers, and restaurants.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 1, Jan 2005, p28-29, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
7047
Author(s):
Abstract:
Cary is North Carolina's seventh largest city with 107,000 residents and 6,000 businesses. In 2004, MONEY MAGAZINE designated the town as the best place to live on the East Coast. Above average home prices, residents with above average incomes (median $75,000), and a high percentage of residents with college degrees (67 percent) were demographics the magazine selected in making their selection. Maurer discusses this city that chose smart growth and culture over urban sprawl and still doubled its population every decade since 1960.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 1, Jan 2005, p23-24, 26, 30-34, il
Record #:
7169
Author(s):
Abstract:
James Speed, Jr., did so well as a CPA that he retired at age 46. He had to be coaxed back to work in 2003 as CEO and president of the North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company. Speed has plans to take the company to new levels. He wants the company to become one of the nation's top 150 insurance companies in terms of gross premiums. In three years the company has moved from $70 million to $140 million annually.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 4, Apr 2005, p48-51, por
Record #:
7243
Author(s):
Abstract:
David Jordan Whichard, III, publisher of Cox North Carolina Publications, Inc., and publisher of the Greenville Daily Reflector, is featured in NORTH CAROLINA magazine executive profile. Whichard was recently named chair of the North Carolina Economic Development Board.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 6, June 2005, p54-57, por
Record #:
7271
Author(s):
Abstract:
David P. Rizzo, president and CEO of NC IDEA, is featured in NORTH CAROLINA magazine executive profile. Rizzo founded and sold Charlotte software company Osprey. He served as president and CEO of MCNC, the Micro-electronic Center of North Carolina. As head of NC IDEA, he oversees plans to seed fund early-stage technology companies in North Carolina.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 7, July 2005, p45-48, por
Record #:
7385
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina's fifty-eight community colleges prepare workers for jobs in existing industries and for the jobs of the future. There is a campus practically within a thirty-minute drive of every state citizen. The community college system had 158,000 students enrolled in distance learning programs in 2004, and another 800,000 students took at least one course on campus. Maurer discusses some of the more unusual course offerings, including aquaculture and marine science, aviation, court reporting and captioning, crime scene investigation, cyberscience investigation, culinary technology and hospitality, and nanotechnology.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 9, Sept 2005, p54, 56-64, 66-67, il
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Record #:
7430
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Abstract:
Dole Foods owner David Murdock, in partnership with the University of North Carolina system and others, will build a biotech campus in Kannapolis. The biopolis will encompass the 250-acre former Cannon Mills plant and the city's entire downtown area. The $1 billion investment will create over 5,000 jobs. The project will include an Institute for Advanced Fruit and Vegetable Science formed by Dole Foods and N.C. State University, one million square feet of office and laboratory space, and a UNC-Charlotte math and science high schools for girls.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 10, Oct 2005, p7, il
Record #:
7435
Author(s):
Abstract:
While business incentives created some controversy, they have been successful in bringing major new companies like Dell Inc. to North Carolina and in expanding current businesses. New facilities and jobs were created. Maurer discusses the state's top ten economic development projects and the top five development projects in each of state's regional districts.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 10, Oct 2005, p14, 16-20, 22-24, 26, 28, 30, il
Record #:
7482
Author(s):
Abstract:
Biotechnology is the most coveted industry in the world, and competition to attract it is very high. For the past two years North Carolina has ranked third in the nation in biotechnology, trailing California and Massachusetts. Efforts to strengthen the state's industry are well underway. “Jobs Across North Carolina” is a strategic plan for spreading biotechnology statewide, and indications are that many of the plan's goals are being met. Goals include offering tax breaks and other economic incentives to bring new biomanufacturing businesses and help existing ones to expand. Maurer discusses a number of biotechnology operations throughout North Carolina.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 11, Nov 2005, p12, 14, 16-19, 21-24, 26-30, il
Record #:
7478
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina will become the first state in the nation to create a 21st century skills center. The center will be part of the N.C. Business Committee for Education, a nonprofit housed in the governor's office. The center will focus on helping students acquire the knowledge and ability needed for success in the global economy. The center's activities will include curriculum design, teacher training, and student assessment.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 11, Nov 2005, p6, il
Record #:
7479
Author(s):
Abstract:
Changes now taking place in downtown Raleigh will transform the city's skyline in the spring of 2006. A public/private investment of over $1 billion in development will include a redesigned Fayetteville Street and a new, state-of-the-art convention center. Planners want more restaurants and activities downtown to appeal to locals as well as the individuals the center will bring in.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 11, Nov 2005, p8, il
Record #:
7483
Author(s):
Abstract:
Alamance Community College in Graham pioneered specialized biotech training. The program started in 1985, and for seventeen years it was the state's only program. Alamance has graduated 165 people in the program since 1985, and the graduates have a 90 percent hiring rate in biotech jobs. Alamance is now part of the community college system's BioWorks program, although it retains its own curriculum.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 11, Nov 2005, p20, il
Record #:
7592
Author(s):
Abstract:
Phil Kirk has been president and CEO of North Carolina Citizens for Business and Industry (NCCBI) and publisher of NORTH CAROLINA magazine for the past sixteen years. He resigned recently to pursue other challenges. Kirk has been a chief of staff to two North Carolina governors and a U.S. Congressman, chairman of the North Carolina State Board of Education, and a lobbyist in the General Assembly.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 12, Dec 2005, p54, il
Record #:
7587
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hospital wellness programs help their own employees and those of regional businesses focus on healthy lifestyles, which include healthy eating, exercise, and disease management. Maurer examines wellness programs: WakeMed's, which began in 1986, in Raleigh; Duke University Medical Center's program, now in operation for twenty-one years, in Durham; and Mission Hospital's, which began eight years ago, in Asheville.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 64 Issue 1, Jan 2006, p12, 14-20, il