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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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10 results for Art, Municipal
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Record #:
1830
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North Carolina has seen a relocation of art pieces from museums and galleries to downtowns, parks, and other public gathering places. Such art is seen as a reflection of the identity of an area, and is available for the general public to view and assess
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Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 44 Issue 8, Aug 1994, p10-11, il
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Record #:
4244
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Public art is art not housed in a museum but found in the everyday environment, like paintings on buildings or the sonic plaza at East Carolina University. It can express an idea or commemorate an event. It can be funded by the state, such as North Carolina's Artworks for Public Buildings Act; by art councils at the state and local level; and by municipalities. Public art in Cary, Charlotte, Raleigh, and Salisbury is profiled.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 64 Issue 4, Summer 1999, p2-9, f
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Record #:
11266
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Public art is art not housed in a museum but found in the everyday environment, like paintings on buildings. The now-defunct Artworks for State Buildings Program was a state-supported program for public art. In 2001, Jeffrey York started Creating Places: A Community Public Art and Design Initiative. The program's objective is to pair community leaders and artists in an effort to develop projects for a specific community, such as the Fish Walk in Morehead City.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 77 Issue 2, July 2009, p90-92, 94-95, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
28556
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Several of Charlotte’s newest and most memorable pieces of public art come from two young, self-taught artists, Matt Hooker and Matt Moore. The duo has painted a variety of murals throughout the city, transforming the way Charlotte looks and feels.
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Record #:
28885
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The Art-in-State Buildings Program, managed by the Visual Arts Section of the North Carolina Arts Council, is a process of utilizing an appropriation from the General Assembly to place art in or around government buildings. The process of selection and placement of art in public spaces is discussed.
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NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 3 Issue 2, Feb 1987, p4-5, il
Record #:
28884
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Controversies over public art are political and involve questions about what is considered art. Debates have been raised over public sculptures in Raleigh and sign ordinances in Asheville.
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NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 3 Issue 2, Feb 1987, p2-3, por
Record #:
28886
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North Carolina artists give their perspectives on the challenges presented when working in a public context. Among these challenges are the specific sites of public art, scale, concessions to utility and public taste, and developing public awareness.
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NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 3 Issue 2, Feb 1987, p9-11, il, por
Record #:
28932
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Grants from the North Carolina Arts Council are enabling seven communities to engage in planning for public art and community design projects. Creating Place is a new pilot grants program designed to encourage communities to include elements of art and design in their redevelopment and cultural tourism plans.
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NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 15 Issue 2, Winter 2001, p9
Record #:
29011
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Creek Week is a series of nature-themed events put on by a partnership of Durham city and county organizations that's designed to raise awareness about the role of local streams in the ecosystem. Candy Carver created visual imagery for the street and curb surrounding a West Main Street storm drain to show people how the storm drainage system moves into the creeks.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 14, April 2017, p24, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
36450
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A creative endeavor Charlotte’s gallery and museum communities activated and Jessica Moss advocated was Roll Up. This project, taking artists out into impoverished and vulnerable parts of town, included underrepresented human subjects in its artwork. Events showcasing these artworks included the New Gallery of Modern Art’s BlackBlooded.