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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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23 results for Art and state
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Record #:
2264
Author(s):
Abstract:
New legislators have brought a different philosophy of the arts to the 1995 General Assembly, pushing cuts in personnel and program funding and requiring artists receiving grant money to sign contracts stating that they will not create \"obscene\" works.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 13 Issue 15, Apr 1995, p14, il Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
2945
Author(s):
Abstract:
Since 1990, arts groups across the state have almost doubled, to around 2,000. At the same time, however, funding and support in the General Assembly is waning, a trend that threatens the work these groups do.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 14 Issue 22, May 1996, p10-12, il Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
3132
Author(s):
Abstract:
Dislike from some public segments and some legislators of two early works in the Art Works for State Buildings Program led to its repeal in 1995. The two works were The Education Wall and The Spiraling Sound Axis, both part of buildings in Raleigh.
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Record #:
3359
Author(s):
Abstract:
Attacks by Congressional Republicans on the National Endowment for the Arts are seriously limiting funds for arts projects. There will be fewer modern-dance performances in the Triangle this year. Universities are also limiting dance offerings.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 13 Issue 36, Sept 1995, p29,31, il Periodical Website
Record #:
3547
Abstract:
Government funding for the arts ebbs and flows. For example, in 1965, Congress funded the National Endowment for the Arts, yet voted to end it in 1997. Such instability makes it difficult for local art groups to plan, develop, and continue programs.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 15 Issue 44, Oct 1997, p23-25 Day 29 Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
3737
Author(s):
Abstract:
With funding for the arts being reduced at the state and federal levels, artists in the Triangle area are seeking new avenues of expression. Many are utilizing their talents in community projects, including painting prison murals and creative writing workshops for inmates.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 15 Issue 46, Nov 1997, p23-24, il Periodical Website
Record #:
24994
Author(s):
Abstract:
While there is extensive intensive interest in the arts in Charlotte, the many fundraising efforts are often in competition for limited funds. Working at cross purposes, different organizations undermine each other. What is really needed is a good, financially stable foundation that the arts can rely on.
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Record #:
28857
Author(s):
Abstract:
The arts in North Carolina play a major role in the success of the state’s third leading industry, tourism. Cultural tourism has attracted visitors to museums, festivals, outdoor dramas, fairs, and various cultural events.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 1 Issue 4, June 1985, p2-3, il, por
Record #:
28859
Author(s):
Abstract:
John Ehle is identified with the start of the North Carolina School of Arts, and recently published his latest novel, Last One Home. Ehle discusses the future of North Carolina’s arts and its role in society.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Sept 1985, p3, por
Record #:
28878
Author(s):
Abstract:
The board chairmen of North Carolina’s three major arts organizations are Gordon Hanes of the North Carolina Museum of Art, Margery Johnson of the North Carolina Symphony, and Michael Newman of the North Carolina Arts Council. They talk about reaching out to school children, rural communities, the governor, and the legislature.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 3 Issue 1, Nov 1986, p6-7, por
Record #:
28885
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Art-in-State Buildings Program, managed by the Visual Arts Section of the North Carolina Arts Council, is a process of utilizing an appropriation from the General Assembly to place art in or around government buildings. The process of selection and placement of art in public spaces is discussed.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 3 Issue 2, Feb 1987, p4-5, il
Record #:
28887
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Arts Council’s Grassroots Arts Program filters money from the state budget back down to the counties, and ensures local decision-making and distribution of funds. Money is allotted reliably and non-competitively to local distributing agents.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 4 Issue 1, Jan 1988, p4-5, il, por
Record #:
28888
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Arts Council’s Touring Program makes music, theatre, and dance accessible to all state citizens. The program tours throughout the state and offers diverse performances in communities and schools.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 4 Issue 1, Jan 1988, p6, il, por
Record #:
28884
Author(s):
Abstract:
Controversies over public art are political and involve questions about what is considered art. Debates have been raised over public sculptures in Raleigh and sign ordinances in Asheville.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 3 Issue 2, Feb 1987, p2-3, por
Record #:
28895
Abstract:
The Arts Congress will be the first-ever gathering of the state’s, business and political leaders to share their ideas and concerns for the future of the arts in North Carolina. The three-day agenda of the special programs and events planned for the conference is presented.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 5 Issue 1, Feb 1989, p2-5, il