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16 results for Sturgis, Sue
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Record #:
2938
Author(s):
Abstract:
Charlie Sanders has been a cardiologist, hospital director, Harvard professor, and CEO of Glaxo in Research Triangle Park. Now he is seeking nomination in the 1996 Democratic senatorial primary for a chance to run against incumbent Jesse Helms.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 14 Issue 12, Mar 1996, p9,10-13, por Periodical Website
Record #:
2945
Author(s):
Abstract:
Since 1990, arts groups across the state have almost doubled, to around 2,000. At the same time, however, funding and support in the General Assembly is waning, a trend that threatens the work these groups do.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 14 Issue 22, May 1996, p10-12, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
3038
Author(s):
Abstract:
Abortion is still legal in the state, but the 1995 General Assembly passed a new parental-consent law and cut the abortion fund from $1.2 million to $50,000. For young and poor women, the changes make qualifying more difficult.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 14 Issue 38, Sept 1996, p11,13-15, il Periodical Website
Record #:
3217
Author(s):
Abstract:
Discrimination in the workplace lawsuits and complaints are rising in the state as minority workers seek better economic and fairer working conditions. Among employers targeted are Harris Teeter Supermarkets, Inc. and Kmart.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 15 Issue 8, Feb 1997, p9,11,13, il Periodical Website
Record #:
3347
Author(s):
Abstract:
The murder of two Afro-Americans in Fayetteville's Campbell Terrace neighborhood by three white-supremacist soldiers did not provoke a violent response. Instead, it was peaceful because of a history of blacks and whites working together.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 14 Issue 2, Jan 1996, p9,11, il Periodical Website
Record #:
3346
Author(s):
Abstract:
Afro-American workers at Duke University charge that the firing of a black bus transportation supervisor is yet another indication that the school treats them differently from other employees. School officials say he was fired for not following orders.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 14 Issue 1, Jan 1996, p9-11, il Periodical Website
Record #:
3460
Author(s):
Abstract:
Most of the reported HIV/AIDS cases in the state in 1996 resulted from use of dirty needles. While groups, including the American Medical Association, favor swapping dirty needles for clean ones, it is against the law in the state to do so.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 15 Issue 22, July 1997, p11-13, il Periodical Website
Record #:
3505
Author(s):
Abstract:
Accomplishments of the 1997 General Assembly include guaranteed wage hikes for workers, teacher raises, and new protections for the environment. Left unsettled was reform of the state's welfare program.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 15 Issue 36, Sept 1997, p15-17,19,21, il Periodical Website
Record #:
3733
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Community Work Program, started in 1994, pays low-risk prison inmates for local government projects, like weeding and roadwork, thereby saving state and local monies. About sixty percent of inmates are working every day.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 15 Issue 15, Apr 1997, p15-18, il Periodical Website
Record #:
3895
Author(s):
Abstract:
While U.S. Senator Lauch Faircloth seeks to garner women's votes through co-sponsorship of a breast-cancer stamp and voting for $1 billion for cancer research, his record shows he actually voted against spending more than that. For example, in 1993, he opposed the expenditure of $2.1 billion for cancer research.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 16 Issue 37, Sept 1998, p26-27, il Periodical Website
Record #:
4196
Author(s):
Abstract:
With the federal government's cancellation of basic commodities price supports in 1996, the state's farmers received lower prices for items including hogs, soybeans, and tobacco. The Specialty-Crops Program, started in 1997, seeks to develop niche crops for farmers to supplement lost income. Echinacea, a plant with healing properties, is being studied as a possible niche crop.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 17 Issue 12, Mar 1999, p13, il Periodical Website
Record #:
4847
Author(s):
Abstract:
One-fourth, or around 1,900 of North Carolina's over 8,100 AIDS cases, are the result of drug users exchanging dirty needles. The Institute of Medicine, a national think tank, proposes a needle-exchange program, whereby drug users can turn in used needles for clean ones. The program is not without its critics, who cite giving drug users drug paraphernalia. There are 100 exchange programs nationwide. North Carolina's only program is in Asheville.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 17 Issue 41, Oct 2000, p14-15, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7244
Author(s):
Abstract:
Sturgis paints a grim future for North Carolina's Outer Banks and coastal counties in the twenty-first century. Global warming is predicted to produce rising oceans levels from fourteen inches to three feet, temperature ranges from four to ten degrees higher than current levels, and more powerful tropical storms. Climate change is a vast and serious problem, but in North Carolina many organizations are bringing people together to address this critical problem. Senate Bill 1134 and House Bill 1191 would establish a commission drawn from these various groups to study the problem. Both this group and the proposed legislation faces opposition from politically powerful corporate interests. Meanwhile, the state's coastline continues to erode.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 22 Issue 19, May 2005, p22-27, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7665
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Progress Energy plans possible nuclear expansion at Wake County's Shearon Harris Plant, citing the region's growing demand for power. The new reactor could be online by 2016. Opponents point out that the addition of another reactor would magnify general problems, including radioactive pollution from routine emissions, the risk of catastrophic releases caused by accident or sabotage, and the lack of long-term planning for storing spent fuel. Sharon Harris currently houses one of the country's largest stockpiles of spent fuel.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 23 Issue 5, Feb 2006, p13-14 Periodical Website
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Record #:
16802
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Abstract:
The North Carolina Voters for Clean Elections (NCVCE) recently published a report documenting campaign donations from the gas industry to pro-fracking politicians. Ten fracking companies donated to more than $730,000 to 100-plus N.C. Legislators between 2009 and 2011. Robert Rucho, a Republican Senator who sponsored Senate Bill 820 allowing fracking, personally received $20,500 from the companies in NCVCE's study.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 29 Issue 22, May 2012, p7 Periodical Website
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