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16 results for Arts--Finance
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Record #:
764
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina businesses have a reputation for generously supporting the arts.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 50 Issue 8, Aug 1992, p16-23, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
1130
Author(s):
Abstract:
Artists in Raleigh and Wake County struggle through a stifling bureaucracy to compete for grants that bestow a pittance.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 11 Issue 24, June 1993, p7-8, por Periodical Website
Record #:
3133
Author(s):
Abstract:
Cutbacks in federal funding for the arts are affecting state groups. For example, the Durham-based African-American Dance Ensemble will reduce performances in smaller communities and school performances.
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Record #:
3160
Author(s):
Abstract:
Overall, private and public support for the arts in the state increased between 1990 and 1995. Federal funds, however, declined significantly, while state and local government funding rose. The private donations, the largest source, rose only moderately.
Source:
North Carolina Insight (NoCar JK 4101 N3x), Vol. 16 Issue 4, Nov 1996, p2-7,14-27,33-54,62-65, il, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
3557
Author(s):
Abstract:
With federal and state funding for the arts declining, a number of the state's corporations are making financial contributions to support programs. For example, NationsBank has given $15 million to support uptown Charlotte art projects.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 55 Issue 10, Oct 1997, p40-41,43-44, il
Record #:
3956
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1997, five Mecklenburg County commissioners, so incensed that the Charlotte Repertory Company was presenting plays with gay themes, completely cut out the commission's annual $2.5 million contribution to the local Arts and Science Council. In a recent election voters replaced four of the five with art supporters.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 17 Issue 9, Mar 1999, p27,29-31, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
15628
Author(s):
Abstract:
The City of Raleigh Arts Commission dodged another bullet this month as the city council ruled not to cut art funding in the search to scrape for money.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 28 Issue 26, June 2011, p24, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
19913
Author(s):
Abstract:
The original budget approved by the House Appropriations subcommittee called for $1.45 million in cuts to the arts. In the late hours of the House session, this amount was amended to $597,000. The Department of Cultural Resources will take the biggest hit, $500,000 and will have to decide where these cuts will be administered.
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Record #:
27483
Author(s):
Abstract:
Similar to the ArtsCenter in Carrboro, the Durham Arts Council Inc. is arts organization which recently opened a new facility and is already facing deficits. The DAC projected operating costs were too low and revenue projections were too high. Reports suggest the DAC grew faster than its management systems could handle and there was a lack of planning and awareness by administrators and the board. The deficit has been slashed from $400, 000 to $35, 000 after cuts and fundraising.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 8 Issue 28, August 1-7 1990, p10 Periodical Website
Record #:
27934
Author(s):
Abstract:
The successes of North Carolina’s arts community are praised. The state has seen an increase in funding for the arts in the state despite the recession. The arts community has also seen their political influence grow as they have been successful in linking creativity to commerce and education. Proving that creativity is wanted by employers, jobs in the creative industry have grown and account for 41.4 billion in goods and services each year. Not known for lobbying, the arts activists in North Carolina finding great success in promoting and funding the arts programs and serve as a model for other states.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 21, May 2010, p5-7 Periodical Website
Record #:
28138
Author(s):
Abstract:
Durham City Council recently restored funding to arts groups which had been absent in its preliminary budget. The victory is given to supporters who lobbied to maintain funding that goes to local cultural organizations. The poor economy was one reason the cuts were proposed, but supporters also discuss the negative impact the lack of a policy to support groups has on funding. Currently, there is no department to oversee arts funding in Durham.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 24, June 2008, p7 Periodical Website
Record #:
28887
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Arts Council’s Grassroots Arts Program filters money from the state budget back down to the counties, and ensures local decision-making and distribution of funds. Money is allotted reliably and non-competitively to local distributing agents.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 4 Issue 1, Jan 1988, p4-5, il, por
Record #:
28899
Author(s):
Abstract:
According to a survey by the North Carolina Arts Council, local tax dollars to arts councils has increased. The increase can be attributed to promoting arts in terms that relate to economic development and state interest.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, Fall 1990, p1-3, por
Record #:
28893
Author(s):
Abstract:
With an annual grants budget of over four-million dollars, each year the North Carolina Arts Council awards over one-thousand grants. An exemplary grant from each section of the Council is outlined.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 4 Issue 2, July 1988, p8-9, il, por, f
Record #:
28903
Abstract:
This article is a chronicle of the first fifteen years of North Carolina’s Grassroots Arts program. The program brings state funds that can be used only for the arts. Overall, the program has strengthened the state arts council’s relationship with local arts agencies.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 8 Issue 2, Fall 1992, p1-3, il, por