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9 results for Tryon, William, 1729-1788
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Record #:
20741
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Abstract:
This is a reprint of a manuscript letter written by Governor William Tryon on July 26, 1765 to an uncle in England providing a casual account of his first nine months in North Carolina. Information of Tryon's arrival and the letter itself as well as biographical information on the letter's recipient is included in Powell's introduction.
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Record #:
24646
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Tryon Palace in New Bern opens to the public April 2, 1959. The original building was commissioned in 1767 by Royal Governor William Tryon (1729-1788); John Hawks (ca. 1734-1790) served as the architect. This article discusses the building’s history and the restorations leading up to its grand opening.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 22, April 1959, p8-9, il
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Record #:
27942
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William Tryon was a British soldier and colonial administrator who served as Governor of North Carolina during 1765 to 1771. His reputation began to fall in 1779 due to a series of allegedly depredatory raids he conducted and his views on desolation warfare. These raids marked the end of Tryon’s career as a field commander in the American Revolution.
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Record #:
28542
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The article examines the Regulators’ and Governor William Tryon’s use of political language and rituals to support their causes and the growing crisis between Britain and the colonies in the 1760s. The author states that the Regulator movement was ultimately shaped by political interests and consequences beyond the state and influenced the American Revolution. Both the Regulators and Tryon believed that the other group did not follow the laws of the country and that this problem could be settled outside the law.
Record #:
29270
Author(s):
Abstract:
William Tryon, fourth royal governor of North Carolina, sent numerous handwritten letters to his family in England. The letters described plans for a Newbern Villa, the bilious disorder of his stomach, and his two-month trip exploring the region he was to govern from 1765 to 1771.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 9 Issue 1, Jan 1981, p38-41, por, map
Record #:
30550
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Abstract:
The Documentary Volumes published by the Division of Archives and History are a collection of writings by notable North Carolina citizens and politicians. The origin of this series dates to a 1903 law that created the North Carolina Historical Commission, and tasked it with collecting valuable NC historical documents.
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Record #:
37385
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The Tryons’ collection of books, which functioned as a library for the community’s upper classes, is a visit-worthy aspect for tours. Of the seven books described, three include photos, notably the reproduced likeness of Jonathan Swift’s The Works of Dr. Swift, Dean of St. Patrick’s, Dublin, Volume III” (1768). Other noteworthy aspects of the collection include books reflecting Mary Tryon’s interest in military history, unusual for that time’s upper-class women.
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The Palace (NoCar F 264 N5 P3), Vol. 13 Issue 2, Winter 2015/2016, p24-26
Record #:
36125
Author(s):
Abstract:
Craven County’s seat can count as part of its illustrious history: becoming the state capital in 1767 and site for the Governor’s new home that year. Even if it played such a role for only twenty-seven years, assured was its permanent place in New Bern’s history, as Tryon Palace.
Record #:
38303
Author(s):
Abstract:
Originally known as the Governor’s Palace, Tryon Palace’s restoration in the late 1950s also entailed rebuilding its grounds. In this part of the project, preservationists had to employ educated guesswork and imagination more than archaeo-historical evidence.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 5, Oct 2011, p196-198, 200, 202, 204, 206, 208 Periodical Website