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44 results for Tryon Palace (New Bern)
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Record #:
133
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Abstract:
A recently discovered plan of the Tryon Palace gardens in New Bern suggests that the grounds were considerably different in the 18th-century.
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Record #:
760
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Recently-discovered documents that describe the government house and gardens of Tryon Palace between 1767 and 1770 have scholars abuzz.
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Record #:
1578
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History surrounds the origin, development and maintenance of Tryon Palace and its gardens in New Bern.
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North Carolina Home (NoCar NA 7235 N8 N32), Vol. 2 Issue 2, Apr 1993, p63-67, il
Record #:
1795
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New Bern's Tryon Palace attracts approximately 75,000 visitors each year. The restored palace and gardens reflect the state's colonial past in impressive fashion.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 62 Issue 3, Aug 1994, p26-29, il
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Record #:
3141
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Christmas tours of New Bern's Tryon Palace and other historic sites, including the John Wright Stanley House, give visitors a feel for Christmas celebrations from the 1770s onward.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Nov/Dec 1996, p2-7, il Periodical Website
Record #:
3142
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In 1798, fire destroyed Tryon Palace in New Bern, only twenty-eight years after its completion. In the 1920s, citizens began to work for its reconstruction, and on April 9, 1959, the palace opened to the public.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Nov/Dec 1996, p8-11, il Periodical Website
Record #:
3610
Author(s):
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The kitchen garden at Tryon Palace measured 16,200 square feet and was enclosed by an eight-foot-high wall. It provided the governor foods of American, European, and African origin, including squash and okra. Some, like salsify, are not common today.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Winter 1998, p18-21, il Periodical Website
Record #:
8082
Author(s):
Abstract:
Tryon Palace was constructed in New Bern between 1767 and 1770. The stately mansion, the seat of Royal Governor William Tryon, was considered the most elegant government building in English America. In 1798, it burned to the ground and was rebuilt from the original plans in the 1950s. Ruckart describes how the land, on which the original Tryon Palace had stood, was used in the intervening years.
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Journal of the New Bern Historical Society (NoCar F 264 N5 J66), Vol. 19 Issue 1, May 2006, p21-32, il, map, f
Record #:
8635
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Abstract:
Emmy-award-winning CC-M Productions, managed by Clare Crawford Mason and her husband, recently came to New Bern's Tryon Palace to film reenactments of the Civil War. CC-M is making a documentary on the pivotal role Tryon Palace played in 18th-century North Carolina history. The film is sponsored by Pepsi-Cola, a company which originated in New Bern. Filmed over the span of one week, the documentary will play in the Tryon Palace auditorium and will be called “The American Palace.”
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 50 Issue 12, May 1983, p8-9, il, por
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Record #:
10046
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Tryon's Palace, once called the most beautiful building in either North or South America, is to be rebuilt, using the original plans which were discovered in the New York Historical Society after being “lost” for ninety years. A fire destroyed the main building and one wing in 1798. Estimated cost is between one-half and one million dollars.
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Record #:
10367
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Tryon Palace, the residence of the Royal Governor in New Bern, was destroyed by fire in 1798. The building has been reconstructed and is being restored in costly detail to the magnificence for which it was famous during colonial times. The building will open in the spring of 1959.
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Record #:
11025
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New Bern's Tryon Palace is marking the 50th year since it was reconstructed. The 18th-century manor house of Royal Governor William Tryon burned in 1798. The building is an exact reproduction built from the original plans. Harrison describes the gardens designed by William Morley that surround the structure.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 76 Issue 11, Apr 2009, p74-76, 78, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
11985
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New Bern's Tryon Palace served as capitol of the Royal Colony of North Carolina and as residence of the royal governor. The restored palace and gardens reflect the state's colonial past in impressive fashion.
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Record #:
12367
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In a few months, restored Tryon Palace in New Bern, will become one of the most visited places in North Carolina. A gift to the people from Mrs. Maude Moore Latham, the restoration project will cost upwards of $2 million dollars.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 25 Issue 23, Apr 1958, p15, il
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Record #:
13127
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DeLue recounts his visit to New Bern. He provides a short history of New Bern and the construction of Royal Governor William Tyron's great palace on the banks of the Trent River. After interest was sparked with the restoration of Williamsburg, Virginia; two New Bern natives, Gertrude S. Carraway and J.E. Latham, decided Tyron Palace deserved to be included in the historic preservation.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 23 Issue 11, Oct 1955, p21-22, f
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