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17 results for North Carolina--History--Regulator Insurrection, 1766-1771
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Record #:
7104
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Before America declared for independence, a group of Piedmont farmers challenged the royal government which was led by Governor William Tryon. The group was not seeking independence from England but reform of existing local governments. Among the complaints against local governments were excessive taxes, illegal fees, corrupt officials, and appointment by the Crown of local officials. Pittard discusses the Regulator Revolt, which culminated in a battle on May 14, 1771, on Alamance Creek between Royal forces and the Regulators and the subsequent hanging of six of the Regulators.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 10, Mar 2005, p68-70, 72-73, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
10627
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The Anson County Historical Society, under the leadership of Linn D. Garibaldi, took possession of the oldest and most historically significant house in Wadesboro from Major L. P. McLendon, prominent Greensboro lawyer, state civic leader, and descendant of Capt. Patrick Boggan, the original builder of the house. The historical society's efforts to preserve the home for a museum and for educational purposes was aided by a 1969 General Assembly grant of $20,000 and a Richardson Foundation grant of $3,000. Capt. Boggan was one of the Anson Regulators who stormed the county courthouse on April 28, 1768 demanding relief from the injustices of Royal Local Magistrates. The Regulators nominated their own Assembly representative, Charles Robinson, making them possibly the first citizens group in America to make a political nomination and certainly among the first to forcibly demand justice from local officers.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 38 Issue 11, Nov 1970, p14-16, 29, il
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Record #:
13879
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On 16 May 1771, 2,000 Regulators fought against 1,200 Militia led by Royal Governor Tryon in the battle of Alamance Creek. Holt discusses the men and circumstances of this famous North Carolina battle fought in Alamance County.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 20 Issue 50, May 1953, p19
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Record #:
14149
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Herman Husband was a leader of the Regulators during the pre-Revolutionary era. He was a man of education and had a talent for public leadership with an inborn hatred of oppression. He represented Orange County in the Colonial Assembly and would have been acclaimed as a patriot had the Regulators been successful at the battle on Great Alamance Creek.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 17 Issue 24, Nov 1949, p11, 17
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Record #:
14716
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The Regulators were vigorous in their protest against unjust tax collections. They offered armed resistance long before the Revolution, but they finally were defeated at Hillsboro.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 12 Issue 18, Sept 1944, p5, 18
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Record #:
19586
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Dr. George Micklejohn's \"Sermon to Tryon's Militia\" (1768) and a \"Table of North Carolina Taxes, 1748-1770\" are the subjects of this article. Micklejohn's sermon denounces Regulators Governor Tryon's aggression and reaffirms his loyalty to the Crown. The Table of Taxes was the third report in a series by John Burgwyn, Clerk of the Court of Chancery and Secretary of the Council that addressed investigations any fraudulent or excessive taxation.
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Record #:
19616
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The third installment of \"Some North Carolina Tracts of the Eighteenth Century,\" by William K. Boyd. John Rutherfurd (1724-1782) was born in Scotland and migrated to North Carolina sometime prior to 1735, settling in Wilmington. He was twice elected town commissioner of Wilmington, appointed by Governor Johnston as a member of the Council and Receiver General of Quit Rents in 1751, and was appointed Lieutenant General of the expedition against the Regulators by Governor Tryon prior to 1768. He wrote \"The Importance of the Colonies to Great Britain, etc.,\" reproduced here in full, in 1761 while in England. The piece examines themes of traditional mercantilism such as the balance of trade between England and the colonies and the future of that balance.
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Record #:
20011
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This is a reprint of \"The Continuation of the Impartial Relation of the First Rise and Cause of the Recent Differences in Publik [sic] Affairs in the Province of North Carolina, Second Part,\" by Hermon Husband and printed in 1770. The Introduction establishes the document as being produced by Husband, a leading champion of the Regulators during the period of popular uprising in North Carolina between 1765 and 1771, and suggests that it is the primary source of knowledge of the Regulator's side in the conflict between Regulators and Royalists. Background information on the document and its author are also included in the introduction.
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Administration of Justice Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7908 .A15 U6), Vol. 18 Issue 1, Jan 1941, p48-81, il, f
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Record #:
21246
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This article examines the movements of Regulators in the Carolinas prior to the Revolutionary War. The article also examines 19th and 20th century literature on the subject to identify evolving interpretations of Regulator activity.
Record #:
21483
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This article looks at religious life in the North Carolina interior and suggests how religion influenced the North Carolina Regulator Movement, a loosely organized protest movement of settlers in the North Carolina backcountry during the 1760s and early 1770s that began as a peaceful expression of the settlers' discontent over political and economic conditions and developed into a series of increasingly violent mob actions that ended with a pitched battle between the Regulators and militia led by the colonial governor.
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Record #:
21700
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This article examines the role of the county clerk in colonial North Carolina. The clerk's duties included maintaining court records, processing documents, and offering legal advice, making it a very influential position. The abuse of power by clerks was a factor in the violent actions of the Regulator movement between 1766 and 1781.
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North Carolina Historical Review (NoCar F251 .N892), Vol. 85 Issue 1, Jan 2008, p133-162 , il, por, map, f Periodical Website
Record #:
23604
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Part 2 of the Story of Charlotte series, \"A Fighting, Trifling Place,\" describes the events in Mecklenburg County from 1770 through the early 1790s. Ideology from Orange and Rowan counties' Regulator Movement causes some riots, but county elites capitalize on the insurrection to reduce colonial taxes and establish Queen's College. Revolutionary thought contributes to the alleged signing of the Mecklenburg Declaration in 1775, while encounters with British troops come in 1780.
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Record #:
22197
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This article recites the sermon given by Reverend George Micklejohn to Governor Tryon's army at Hillsborough, North Carolina on September 25, 1768. This force had been convened by Governor Tryon to quell insurrection by Regulators in the countryside.
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Record #:
22518
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The early stages of the Regulator Movement in Eastern North Carolina may have had its roots in the division of power between the royal governor and Lord Granville's agents. George Sims first summed up the grievances of the Regulator movement; his family roots in Granville County constitute an addendum to add detail to the little that is known of Sims' life and association.
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Record #:
17282
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Just outside Burlington, you can visit the Alamance Battleground State Historic Site. There, North Carolina governor William Tryon and his soldiers defeated a group of reform-minded farmers known as the Regulators in 1771.
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