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9 results for Wake County--History
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Record #:
11716
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Named for Governor William Tryon's wife, Margaret Wake, Wake County was first settled in the 1740s. Designated the temporary seat of government in 1781 during the American Revolution, Wake County continues in this role today.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 32 Issue 23, Apr 1965, p10-11, 65-70, il
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Record #:
11717
Abstract:
Covering 864 square miles and host to the state capital, Wake County boasts a number of art, educational, and industrial facilities. Designated as the economic capital of the coastal plains and centrally located within the state, Wake County is also known for agricultural production as well as the famed research triangle.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 32 Issue 23, Apr 1965, p12-13, 58-64, il
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Record #:
11718
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Providing history and information relative to the towns in Wake County facts pertaining to: Apex, Cary, Fuquay-Varina, Garner, Knightdale, Morrisville, Holly Springs, Wake Forest, Wendell, Zebulon, and Rolesville, can be found within this article.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 32 Issue 23, Apr 1965, p21-22, 38-39, 42-47, il
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Record #:
24600
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Archie Davis helped found North Carolina’s Research Triangle Park in the 1960s. The park opened with the goals of providing jobs and working for education on and off campus. Throughout its existence, it has done both by working with the nearby universities and by drawing companies, like IBM, to the area.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 4, September 2014, p44-46, 48,50-51, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
24747
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The city of Raleigh dates back to the late eighteenth century and it has undergone a number of structural changes ever since. Author Scott Huler examines Raleigh through the history of its streets and parks, reflecting on how the early grid system influenced Raleigh’s growth over the years.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 7, December 2015, p58. 60, 62, 64, 66-67, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
22079
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A look at the origin, colonial history, Revolutionary War History, and general history of Wake County through the year of 1783.
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Record #:
28198
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Wake County Commissioners are not serving student and school needs in Wake County. The new Republican majority has not honored promises made to be a bipartisan body and proposed a second bond referendum in one year. Wake County needs more schools, but the commissioners are trying to make this happen in the wrong way.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 6, February 2007, p17 Periodical Website
Record #:
31593
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Abstract:
: In southeastern North Carolina the remains of what could have been ossuary burial practices have been observed since the late 1800s. In 1884 J. A. Holmes observed that the burial mounds in Duplin, Sampson, Robeson, Cumberland, and southern Wake counties had certain common characteristics. In this article Hogue outlines methods for analyzing the skeletal material found in these ossuaries.
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Record #:
37385
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The Tryons’ collection of books, which functioned as a library for the community’s upper classes, is a visit-worthy aspect for tours. Of the seven books described, three include photos, notably the reproduced likeness of Jonathan Swift’s The Works of Dr. Swift, Dean of St. Patrick’s, Dublin, Volume III” (1768). Other noteworthy aspects of the collection include books reflecting Mary Tryon’s interest in military history, unusual for that time’s upper-class women.
Source:
The Palace (NoCar F 264 N5 P3), Vol. 13 Issue 2, Winter 2015/2016, p24-26