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6 results for Tryon Palace (New Bern)--Gardens
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Record #:
19330
Author(s):
Abstract:
British colonists began constructing royal governor William Tryon's palace in 1767 complete with landscaped grounds. Plans or details concerning the landscaping do not exist but when but historical drawings of New Bern and archaeological excavations around the property influenced the contemporary gardens. Morley Jeffers Williams advised the layout of the recreated 18th-century English gardens around the palace, and his designs and procedures are described.
Source:
North Carolina Home (NoCar NA 7235 N8 N32), Vol. 2 Issue 2, April 1993, p62-67, il
Record #:
19047
Author(s):
Abstract:
Reimer discusses the preservation of Tryon Palace's famous gardens, including labor intensive archaeological investigations, historical investigations into garden designs and horticulture.
Source:
The Palace (NoCar F 264 N5 P3), Vol. 9 Issue 4, Summer 2009, p4-5, bibl, f
Full Text:
Record #:
18974
Author(s):
Abstract:
Herko discusses the gardens and landscape of Tryon Palace in New Bern. Five staff gardeners work with an eye toward history in maintaining the grounds and presenting them as accurately as possible.
Source:
The Palace (NoCar F 264 N5 P3), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Winter 2001, p4-5, f
Full Text:
Record #:
34826
Author(s):
Abstract:
This quick guide to public gardens in the Carolinas highlights two in North Carolina: Paul J. Ciener Botanical Garden and Tryon Palace. Special emphasis is placed on Paul J. Ciener Botanical Garden and their award-winning displays.
Source:
Record #:
37414
Author(s):
Abstract:
Tyron Palace conservationists offered painstaking effort to restore the windows, installed in 1959, to their original state. Described in detail was the process of restoring this part of the Palace. It is equivalent to efforts taken in other Palace projects, such as restoring the gazebo spire in the Stanly House gardens.
Source:
The Palace (NoCar F 264 N5 P3), Vol. 12 Issue 1, Winter 2013/2014, p8-9
Record #:
38303
Author(s):
Abstract:
Originally known as the Governor’s Palace, Tryon Palace’s restoration in the late 1950s also entailed rebuilding its grounds. In this part of the project, preservationists had to employ educated guesswork and imagination more than archaeo-historical evidence.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 5, Oct 2011, p196-198, 200, 202, 204, 206, 208 Periodical Website