NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


5 results for Kernersville--Description and travel
Currently viewing results 1 - 5
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
6852
Author(s):
Abstract:
Kernersville, incorporated in 1871, is OUR STATE magazine's featured Tar Heel town of the month. The Forsyth County town traces its history back to 1745, when William Dobson, a wealthy Irish immigrant, built an inn and store on the present site. The economy of the town was tied to tobacco, furniture, and textiles in the 20th-century, but those industries have declined. Today the town is home to 12 motor freight companies and over two dozen small manufacturing companies. One of the interesting sites to visit is the home Jule Korner built in Kernersville in 1880. Dubbed \"Korner's Folly,\" the red brick building stands 100 feet high, has seven stories, and is a wonder of opulence, oddity, detail, and combined architectural styles. The 22-room mansion is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Other points of interest are the Pegg House Tea Room, Honeybee Festival, and the Kernersville Little Theater.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 4, Sept 2004, p18-20, 22, il, map Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
13513
Author(s):
Abstract:
Dobson details the towns of Forsythe County, including Kernersville, Bethania, and Belews Creek.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 21 Issue 35, Jan 1954, p16-17, 19, f
Full Text:
Record #:
16542
Author(s):
Abstract:
Kernersville, located in Forsyth County, is featured in OUR STATE magazine's Tar Heel Town of the Month section. Among the sights to see are North Carolina's oddest home, Korner's Folly; the Moravian Church; Prissy Polly's, which serves Lexington-style and eastern-style barbecue; and Shakespeare and Co. Bookshop.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 12, May 2012, p46-48, 50-52, 54, 56, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
31080
Author(s):
Abstract:
K?rner’s Folly, dubbed “The Strangest House in the World,” has long amused visitors who gape at its fanciful Victorian rooms, furniture, and private theater. Built in 1880, the house was the showplace of Jule Gilmer K?rner, a talented furniture and interior designer in Kernersville, North Carolina. Starting next month, the historic home hosts a year-long set of activities to celebrate its 125th anniversary.
Source:
Record #:
34826
Author(s):
Abstract:
This quick guide to public gardens in the Carolinas highlights two in North Carolina: Paul J. Ciener Botanical Garden and Tryon Palace. Special emphasis is placed on Paul J. Ciener Botanical Garden and their award-winning displays.
Source: