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10 results for Portsmouth Island--Description and travel
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Record #:
4233
Author(s):
Abstract:
The village of Portsmouth on North Core Banks, a once bustling fishing village, stands uninhabited since the last residents left in 1971. The village, founded in 1753, is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and contains twenty structures, including a post office, church, and several cemeteries. Around 700 people visit Portsmouth each month in warm weather.
Source:
Record #:
5837
Author(s):
Abstract:
The village of Portsmouth, located on North Core Banks, was founded in 1753 and was once a bustling fishing village. Today it is empty - a village of deserted buildings and no residents. White describes life in the village as it used to be.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1973, p12-15, 29, il
Record #:
8592
Author(s):
Abstract:
Founded in 1753, the town of Portsmouth on the Outer Banks was a lively place of 505 people. Shipping was an important activity because inbound ships were stopped by the shallow waters and had to unload cargo at Portsmouth into smaller, shallow-draft vessels that could carry it across to the mainland. Activity in the town reached a peak in the mid-19th-century, afterward declined because of hurricanes, channels that filled with sand, and shipping activities falling off. By the early 1970s, the last residents had departed. All that remains of the town are 20 structures, including a post office, church, a schoolhouse, and several cemeteries.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 8 Issue 2, Feb 1976, p7-9, il, map Periodical Website
Record #:
9751
Author(s):
Abstract:
The village of Portsmouth, located on North Core Banks, was founded in 1753 and was once a bustling fishing village. Today it is empty - a village of deserted buildings and no residents, except for a few visiting fishermen and beachcombers.
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Record #:
28693
Author(s):
Abstract:
Rudy Austin and his family are Ocracoke Island natives who have made it possible for people to visit Portsmouth Island via boat for 40 years. Austin’s father once worked on the now uninhabited island and started taking visitors to the island when the National Park Service took over its management in the 1970s. The Austin’s are the only ferry service and as they age, many wonder what will happen to Portsmouth Island.
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Record #:
34730
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Outer Banks north of Cape Lookout boast the highest number of Coast Guard Stations—25 in total. The most dangerous stretches of coast are guarded by the Cape Lookout and Portsmouth stations. The town of Portsmouth is nestled at the northern end of Portsmouth island across the inlet from Ocracoke. Inhabited by 150 people during the early 20th century, the town contains a Coast Guard station, Methodist church, and village store. Residents keep sheep and chickens while wild ponies roam the island. Some of these are trained by Coast Guardsmen, who use them to patrol the beach during nightly watches.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 23 Issue 1, Spring-Summer 2007, p16-18, il, map
Record #:
35555
Author(s):
Abstract:
In Core Sound was a village that might be rightly called a ghost town. Not a single living inhabitant resides there, as anyone who visits by ferry, beach buggy, or air can attest. In fact, only two things remained in a town the author proclaimed held promise upon its founding in 1753. One is the physical reminders of lifeways gone by, like an enclave of houses and outbuildings maintained by the owners’ descendants. Another was memories of life in a town that started its long, gradual decline by the early nineteenth century.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1973, p12-15, 29
Record #:
35556
Author(s):
Abstract:
As a companion article to “Portsmouth Island Stands in the Backwash of Time” was a profile of the last permanent resident of the Core Sound town. Profiled was Henry Piggott, resident during the sum of his seventy four years and now resident of the family cemetery. Profiled also was the small pink house in which Piggott resided. The dwelling held remnants of lifeways gone by, such as the kitchen and bathroom as separate buildings.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1973, p16-17
Record #:
35809
Author(s):
Abstract:
Noted first were reasons to appreciate the Coast and its waters, particularly sites that lend appeal. Land marks ranged from the well-known Outer Banks to perhaps lesser known Bird’s Island. Towns included famed Kittyhawk to the famed by relatively few Duck. As for what he saw as evidence of being taken for granted: pollution of air and water, destruction to dunes and wildlife. Out of an enduring appreciation for, and mounting concern about, he called for all North Carolinians to restore the Coast and its waters for future generations and out of a sacred duty.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1979, p40-42, 56-60
Record #:
37370
Abstract:
Getting to Portsmouth Island is a challenge but the journey is worth the effort, according to the author. Among the perks Portsmouth has to offer is an environment that may make one feel as if a trip has been taken back in time. Reason noted by Rumley for this feeling: Portsmouth’s population has dwindled to summer tourists and fishermen; the place hasn’t changed much since its Colonial beginnings.