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10 results for Ocracoke Island--Description and travel
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Record #:
13956
Author(s):
Abstract:
Ocracoke Island has many pleasant features: a slim sand bar, beaches with romantic relics of old shipwrecks, 80 varieties of tropical fish and 15 kinds of fowl, herds of wild ponies and a friendly population.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 18 Issue 21, Oct 1950, p3-4, 21, f
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Record #:
14218
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Abstract:
Ocracoke Island, a small, fourteen-mile long bit of land just south of Hatteras Island, is one of the prime vacation spots on the Outer Banks. It is home to about nine hundred residents. Our State Magazine features it in its Tar Heel Place of the Month.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 1, June 2011, p30-34, 36--38, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
14694
Author(s):
Abstract:
Ocracoke Island measures seventeen miles long and about a mile wide and in 1947 had a population of 800. Citizens of Silver Lake were dependent on fishing for primary income. 100 fishing boats harvested oysters, shrimp, and various species of fish. The Navy and Coast Guard was the largest establishment, though far less active than during World War II.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 14 Issue 50, May 1947, p3-5, 18, il
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Record #:
17812
Author(s):
Abstract:
In another of his travel articles to various places in the state, Goerch visits Ocracoke Island, part of the Outer Banks
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 7 Issue 43, Mar 1940, p1-3, 20, 26, il
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Record #:
24660
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article serves as a guide for tourists who wish to travel to the central coastal region in North Carolina and focuses on cities such as Morehead, Ocracoke, and Carteret.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 25 Issue 2, June 1957, p38-43, 55, il
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Record #:
24693
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author discusses the development set to take place on Ocracoke, including a newly paved road that would bring in more tourists and change the quaint atmosphere of the area.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 25, May 1955, p13, 29, il
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Record #:
25101
Author(s):
Abstract:
The beaches of the Outer Banks are constantly changing as the waves reshape the land. By the turn of the next century, Ocracoke Island may even be underwater due to such changes. However, the constant transformation of the landscape does not take away from the beauty of the land, nor North Carolinians’ affection for it.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 11, April 2016, p154-156, 158-159, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
28693
Author(s):
Abstract:
Rudy Austin and his family are Ocracoke Island natives who have made it possible for people to visit Portsmouth Island via boat for 40 years. Austin’s father once worked on the now uninhabited island and started taking visitors to the island when the National Park Service took over its management in the 1970s. The Austin’s are the only ferry service and as they age, many wonder what will happen to Portsmouth Island.
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Record #:
35561
Author(s):
Abstract:
The village in need of fresh water was Ocracoke. How this need was met for the almost four hundred year old town contained an irony. Desalinization entailed removing the saline from the water that surrounded them: the sea.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1973, p40-41, 45
Record #:
35857
Author(s):
Abstract:
What made Ocracoke unique from many other NC towns was heard in an accent betraying the area’s English roots. As for what could be seen, they were reasonably priced accommodations for visitors and friendliness of people descended from the original dozen families.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 4, May 1980, p43-45