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5 results for Lightships
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Record #:
5036
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Dangerous shoals in the Atlantic are now marked by automated lights atop steel towers. Before this, a lightship was the only solution. Lightships were manned vessels with lighted masts moored near dangerous areas to warn mariners. They were first used off North Carolina in 1824, and the last one was replaced at Diamond Shoals in 1966. Norris recounts the histories of several of these vessels.
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Record #:
13189
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Sharpe details the day-in-the-life of a crewman on board one of North Carolina's floating lighthouses. He also provides the history of Diamond Shoals Lightship.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 23 Issue 22, Mar 1956, p18-19, 30, f
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Record #:
13972
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The government tried twice to put up a tower on the Diamond Shoals lightship, but in both instances the venture proved to be a failure.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 18 Issue 33, Jan 1951, p7, 26, f
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Record #:
35575
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A long running lightship found a new job by serving as a monument to a lifestyle gone by. How it became a cultural record for Southport, its final harbor: being converted into a museum.
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New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 4, Aug/Sept 1973, p14-15
Record #:
35957
Author(s):
Abstract:
Remnants of a famous—and infamous—pirate’s legend were in a familial connection (one of Blackbeard’s wives, a native); his naming of Ocracoke; his death, when he reportedly sailed around the ship seven times after his beheading. Other remnants of the importance of ships were shipwrecks, such as the Carroll A. Derring. As for the origins for other town names, noted were Kill Devil Hills and Chicamacomico, both inspired by the original inhabitants.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Summer 1974, p34-38