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14 results for Morehead City--Description and travel
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Record #:
14258
Abstract:
Indications are that the biggest crowds in the history of Morehead City and Atlantic Beach will visit that section of North Carolina this summer.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 15 Issue 3, June 1947, p8-9, f
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Record #:
15659
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Abstract:
deLue, the travel editor of the Boston Globe, continues his trip through eastern North Carolina, this time stopping in Morehead City. He briefly describes what he observed on the forty-mile bus ride from New Bern to the city and concentrates the majority of the article on the activities at the Morehead City Port.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 23 Issue 13, Nov 1955, p19-20, 28, il
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Record #:
19412
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Morehead City, the hub of Carteret County, is featured in Our State Magazine's Tar Heel Town of the Month section. Among the things to see there are Floyd's 1921 Restaurant; Dee Gee's Gifts and Books, the oldest independently owned bookstore in the state; and the Ruddy Duck Tavern.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 11, Apr 2013, p34-36, 38, 40, 42-46, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
24514
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This article discusses the New Atlantic Hotel that opened in 1889 in Morehead City, which replaced the one that was washed away during a storm in 1879.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 45 Issue 12, May 1978, p16-19, il
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Record #:
24660
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Abstract:
This article serves as a guide for tourists who wish to travel to the central coastal region in North Carolina and focuses on cities such as Morehead, Ocracoke, and Carteret.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 25 Issue 2, June 1957, p38-43, 55, il
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Record #:
24717
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The author discusses his experience traveling from Raleigh to the eastern coast of North Carolina to visit Beaufort and Morehead City.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 1, June 1951, p3-5, 17, il, map
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Record #:
34491
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Abstract:
This article is part of a larger work by Gules detailing an itinerary from Washington D.C. to Miami, FL. In this segment, Gules records first impressions of Beaufort and Morehead City.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 9 Issue 2, Spring 1993, p18, il, map
Record #:
34635
Author(s):
Abstract:
U.S. Coast Guard Cutter CHILULA was stationed in Morehead City, NC for 35 years, serving between 1956 and 1991. CHILULA was built in 1945 as a Navajo-class tug for use in the U.S. Navy. Decommissioned in 1947, the tug was towed to Morehead City a decade later for use in the U.S. Coast Guard. The author served on board as a Quartermaster and recalls the juxtaposition between life on board and his liberty time in Morehead City. The vessel participated in both search and rescue activities and conducted narcotics patrols in southern waters. USCGC CHILULA was retired from service in June, 1991 and intentionally sunk.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 16 Issue 3, Winter 2000, p14-19, il, por
Record #:
34646
Author(s):
Abstract:
Author Pat Davis grew up in Durham but spent his summers at Morehead City. His family owned a cottage on 12th Street which was still ‘undiscovered’ by wealthy vacationers. The family rarely ate out while visiting the coast due to the large amount of tourist traffic. The author recalls spending time at the beach and visiting various establishments including the dog races. Following the Korean War, the family stopped visiting Bogue Banks.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 17 Issue 1, Spring 2001, p8-10, il
Record #:
34678
Abstract:
The U Drop Inn was built as a rooming house in Morehead City during the 1920s. Featuring 15 rooms and 30 beds, the inn was run by Lillian English Robinson from the 1940s through 1963. Single rooms cost $2.00 while a double room could be rented for $5.00 per night. A frequent lodging house during World War II, the inn was frequented by many return guests. A local restaurant purchased the property in the 1960s, and the building was bulldozed in 1967.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 18 Issue 2, Winter 2002, p21-22, il
Record #:
34748
Author(s):
Abstract:
Sugarloaf Island sits across the water from Morehead City’s waterfront. First deeded to a local citizen in 1818, many residents in Morehead City today remember playing on the island as children. Fishermen used the small island to dry nets while the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers used the area to dump dredge spoil. In 2002, the town purchased the island as a city park and installed a foot path, boat dock, and rest rooms to increase accessibility and ease of use. Various species have been identified on the island and are recorded in an interpretive trail map.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 22 Issue 2, Fall-Winter 2006, p3-4, il
Record #:
34789
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During the 1950s, the author worked as a summer camp counselor at Camp Morehead. Primarily a boys’ camp, three weeks were set aside each summer for co-ed habitation. The author herself had attended camp during one such session where she learned to sail. Returning in college as a counselor, the author was placed in charge of sailing instruction and office duty which included running errands. Throughout the summer, campers were brought into Morehead City to visit various stores and enjoy some of the local cuisine.
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The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 25 Issue 2, Summer/Fall 2010, p5-7, il, por
Record #:
34894
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Abstract:
In this Ramblin’ Man column, author T. Edward Nickens recounts his adventure on a deep-sea charter out of Moreheard City, North Carolina. Fishing in the Gulf Stream off the coast of North Carolina results in large, colorful catches.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 1, June 2017, p70-75, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
35610
Author(s):
Abstract:
By 1973's dog days of summer, the Coastal Plains Regional Commission had realized its short term goal for Wheeler Airlines. It was a connection between Morehead City (offering seasonal peaks of business) to Greenville (promising the greater likelihood of year around brisk business). As for its long term goal, that was to extend this aerial connection to Elizabeth City, Jacksonville, and Washington. From this, the hope was to resolve even more effectively the long recognized aerial transport issue for Eastern NC.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 5, Nov/Dec 1973, p14, 29