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13 results for Tourism--North Carolina, Coastal
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Record #:
17722
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Visitors to coastal North Carolina want to not only observe nature but experience it as well. Lucky for them, North Carolina's coast offers a growing number of nature-based opportunities to complement traditional leisure activities.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 3, Summer 2012, p6-11, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
19252
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Going to museums and aquariums is not what it used to be Coastal North Carolina museums and aquariums offer a variety of exhibits and programs about ecology, history, and art.
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Record #:
19251
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Friday details the many opportunities for outdoor enthusiasts offered by coastal North Carolina. From beaches and state parks to national seashores and wildlife refuges, coastal North Carolina offers a lot.
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Record #:
19253
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There are numerous historic sites throughout coastal North Carolina that range from the time of exploration to World War II.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. 13 Issue 4, Apr 1986, p8-10, f Periodical Website
Record #:
24659
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This article serves as a guide for tourists who wish to travel to the Northeast coastal region in North Carolina and focuses on cities such as Kill Devil Hills, the Outer Banks, and the Albemarle Sound.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 25 Issue 2, June 1957, p33-37, il
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Record #:
24661
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This article serves as a guide for tourists who wish to travel to the southeast coastal region in North Carolina and focuses on Wrightsville Beach, Brunswick Beach, and Topsail Island.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 25 Issue 2, June 1957, p44-49, il
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Record #:
24660
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This article serves as a guide for tourists who wish to travel to the central coastal region in North Carolina and focuses on cities such as Morehead, Ocracoke, and Carteret.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 25 Issue 2, June 1957, p38-43, 55, il
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Record #:
24673
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The author provides an inventory of progress at North Carolina’s ocean resorts and local beaches. Much of the article focuses on beach restoration practices, such as creating artificial dunes to keep shorelines from shifting.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 20, February 1955, p30-33, il
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Record #:
28274
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Concerns over highway and building construction have some worried about the safety of North Carolina’s culture and heritage. The Historyland Trails Plan promote North Carolina's historic heritage as a tourist attraction. Wilmington's history plays a part in the plan.
Record #:
28448
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Abstract:
Venues across coastal North Carolina are enhancing visitors’ travel experiences. More than four-hundred accessible attractions are offered in ACCESS North Carolina, a vacation and travel guide for people with accessibility needs.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 2, Spring 2017, p24-27, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
28597
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Oak Island has a reputation as a low-key oceanfront hideaway. Tourism is its main industry and the Cape Fear Regional Jetport on mainland Brunswick County is the busiest general-aviation airport in the state. The county is one of the fastest growing in the state. The residents of the island want smart growth to maintain the lifestyle and culture that Oak Island and Brunswick County have worked to create.
Record #:
31645
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Buxton, the largest town on the island with about seven-hundred residents, hosts thousands of visitors each year to the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse. There is also the United States Weather Station, a Naval facility, and a Coast Guard station at Buxton. With an increasing number of visitors, tourism has replaced commercial fishing as the major private industry.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 7 Issue 8, Aug 1975, p6-8, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
32207
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November through March is the off-season for tourism in North Carolina. Visitors to the coast can enjoy smaller crowds and support a variety of local businesses. This article highlights various museums, state parks, and attractions for visitors during the winter season.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 1, Winter 2018, p30-35, il, por Periodical Website
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