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7 results for Beaches--North Carolina, Eastern
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Record #:
12620
Author(s):
Abstract:
After the completion of several surveys on ocean subdivision projects, reviewers were astonished at the speed of development and consequent sale of residential property to individual owners. By and large, the subdivisions now mark the end of an era, within 25 years there will be little to no land to develop for subdivisions. Already, the most desirable ocean front properties are selling for $50 to $100 per foot, and even the less desirable beach property has doubled and tripled in price in the last six years.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 1, June 1958, p8-10, 21, il
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Record #:
24673
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author provides an inventory of progress at North Carolina’s ocean resorts and local beaches. Much of the article focuses on beach restoration practices, such as creating artificial dunes to keep shorelines from shifting.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 20, February 1955, p30-33, il
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Record #:
25590
Author(s):
Abstract:
Research conducted by THE INDEPENDENT found that 5,738 condominiums have been built or authorized in the coastal towns – almost all within the past four years. The “condominium explosion” is no secret, but the environmental and social effects of this construction boom have been largely ignored.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 2 Issue 13, July 6-19 1984, p3, 8, por, map Periodical Website
Record #:
30438
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina's beaches are witnessing rapid clean up and rebuilding after Hurricane Hazel. Although property damage was extensive on larger and smaller beaches, the general condition of the beaches is looking good. Most beach activities are returning to normal, and fishing is again drawing thousands of visitors to the coast. Beach residents, hotel managers, and lodges are hoping that fishing tourism will also aid in restoring and rebuilding some of the more damaged components.
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Record #:
30795
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina has been endowed with a variety of breath-taking natural attractions, but many visitors prefer the coast. For sportsmen and boaters, or families and day-trippers, North Carolina's southeastern beaches sun, sand, and entertainment.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 16 Issue 2, June 1958, p24, 26, 28, por, map
Record #:
35311
Author(s):
Abstract:
This edition of adventures across the state featured a contribution by Ven Carver. This edition included descriptions of jam sessions in the Blue Ridge Mountains, eateries in the Research Triangle area, and marine-side views in piers along Wrightsville Beach. In addition was a list of GreenTravel visit locales for ecologically conscious sojourners.
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Record #:
38223
Author(s):
Abstract:
Today, the name Havelock may be synonymous with the air force station located nearby, which currently employs more than 14,300 individuals and generates 2.2 billion dollars for the region’s economy. Perhaps not considered so often about the town first named Slocum’s Creek is its close proximity to Crystal Coast beaches. It was cited by the author as a factor leading many personnel stationed at Cherry Point to make Havelock home, post retirement.