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13 results for City planning
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Record #:
496
Author(s):
Abstract:
Developers, municipalities, and citizens have become the major players in the urban development scene, each with its own power base and mode of interaction.
Source:
Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 12 Issue 1, Summer 1986, p10-17, il, bibl, f
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Record #:
822
Author(s):
Abstract:
Former Cary planning board member Robert C. Hinshaw shares his insights on the role of the planner who holds elective office.
Source:
Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 16 Issue 1, Spring 1990, p21-25, f
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Record #:
2958
Abstract:
Neotraditional communities, or communities with houses, condos, shops, schools, and offices patterned like old-fashioned neighborhoods, are developing in reaction to the isolation of suburban sprawl. Chapel Hill's Southern Village is the state's first.
Source:
Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 46 Issue 6, June 1996, p1,8-9, il
Record #:
7283
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mixed-use development combines retail, office, and residential opportunities in a walkable vicinity. It is a development trend that is taking root in city centers and suburbs all over the country. People want to live closer to places where they work, shop, and dine. Lail discusses how this building concept is working in a number of cities and towns in North Carolina, including Huntersville and Hendersonville.
Source:
Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 55 Issue 6, June 2005, p1, 8-9, il
Record #:
17452
Abstract:
North Carolina cities as a group stand above the average of comparable cities over the country in almost every aspect of city planning activity.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 16 Issue 3, Dec 1949, p8-9
Subject(s):
Record #:
17600
Abstract:
A remarkable burst of activity in the fields of city planning and zoning has taken place in North Carolina cities and towns since World War II. Various city planning and zone boards and commissions are providing a wide variety of programs and activities to improve city development.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 19 Issue 1, Sept 1952, p10-11
Subject(s):
Record #:
17626
Abstract:
The Institute of Government hosted fourteen students in January 1961 to discuss and provide tutelage in the area of technical city planning. At the time, urban development was a nascent profession and its theory and application were still forming. Instructors were from the Research Triangle Planning Commission, the Highway Department, and The Institute of Government.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 27 Issue 6, Mar 1961, p8-9, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
17650
Abstract:
A section of the North Carolina General Assembly provides that every city and town in the state is authorized to create a Planning Board whose duty it is to study the resources, needs, conditions, and possibilities of municipality development.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 19 Issue 6, Feb 1953, p7-8
Subject(s):
Record #:
17658
Author(s):
Abstract:
Civic development focused on downtown spaces was a focal point for local officials in the mid 20th century. Interest grew after the Institute of Government hosted a Central Business District Seminar Series in the spring of 1961. Fourteen cities (Ahoskie, Asheville, Chapel Hill, Charlotte, Durham, Greensboro, High Point, Laurinburg, Mooresville, Raleigh, Rockingham, Salisbury, Selma, and Winston-Salem) reported on efforts to increase business and tourism along their respective city centers.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 28 Issue 7, May 1962, p6-13, il
Record #:
21018
Author(s):
Abstract:
Towns grew into cities because of population increases after the industrial revolution occurred. Growth was unplanned and haphazard, straining infrastructure. The years between 1900 and 1913 saw interest in reform, design, beautification, and city clean-up. Between 1913 and 1929, city planning was formalized, and supporting organizations including chambers of commerce, City Beautiful and city planning commissions were formed. Regulations like zoning ordinances, city plans and studies, and subdivision regulations were created.
Subject(s):
Record #:
22287
Abstract:
Larkin examines the work of the Asheville Design Center, a nonprofit that is "helping communities create blueprints for brighter futures." These include plans for outdoor learning environments, such as Hall Fletcher Elementary in West Asheville and the revitalization of Island Park in Bryson City.
Source:
WNC Magazine (NoCar F261 .W64), Vol. 6 Issue 8, Oct 2012, p46-53, il, map Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
25590
Author(s):
Abstract:
Research conducted by THE INDEPENDENT found that 5,738 condominiums have been built or authorized in the coastal towns – almost all within the past four years. The “condominium explosion” is no secret, but the environmental and social effects of this construction boom have been largely ignored.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 2 Issue 13, July 6-19 1984, p3, 8, por, map Periodical Website
Record #:
28164
Author(s):
Abstract:
John McLellan, a member of the New Bern Planning and Zoning Board, shares his thoughts and predictions about New Bern in the next twenty-five years. He discusses future growth patterns, development, and issues which may temper growth.