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16 results for Charlotte--Development
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Record #:
20410
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Since Charlotte can no longer grow out, city leaders and project developers are pouring millions of dollars into the heart of the city, providing more than just concrete. New projects include stadiums and sports venues, parks, and apartments.
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23549
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Charlotte's EpiCenter's new owners work hard to remake the venue's image after the recession.
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23559
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The authors discuss the various ways entrepreneurs seek to revitalize Charlotte.
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24213
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The author discusses the intricacies of demolishing old neighborhoods to rebuild them into modern homes and businesses. Simonini Builders Inc., based out of Charlotte, is the focus of this article.
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24298
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Charlotte has seen an increase in construction downtown recently, as businesses move into the region. Two banks, Bank-America Corp. and First Union Corp., are competing for the distinction of having the tallest buildings in the city. Both banks have big construction plans for the future.
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24331
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Interstate highways attract business and foster growth. Charlotte is an example a commercial center benefitting from the presence of interstates, specifically, I-85 and I-77.
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24350
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Charlotte is known as a development hub in North Carolina, which has helped its economy to grow continuously. Various companies have helped bolster the nation’s sixth-largest distribution center.
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24391
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The Outer Loop in Charlotte was once envisioned as the solution to traffic congestion, but many leaders think of it as only a temporary solution. This article examines the possible future of the Outer Loop and how developers capitalized on the beltway.
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24914
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Jeremy Markovich explains why there is no need to be sad or upset every time a building is torn down in Charlotte. The way he sees it, they’re not tearing down history, they’re tearing down old and outdated buildings that are hard to miss once something nicer has replaced it.
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Record #:
24942
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There is growing concern that the integrity of the Coulwood area of Charlotte will be lost if it is allowed to be developed. Its vast difference from the more urban portions of Charlotte is what makes it unique.
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Record #:
28569
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Two Charlotte developers are about to embark on the city’s biggest development in decades, on the last large piece of undeveloped land in Mecklenburg County. The planned development is named the River District, and will be located between the Catawba River and Charlotte Douglas International Airport.
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Record #:
32318
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Stanford R. Brookshire retires this July as Charlotte’s mayor after four busy terms. In this article, Brookshire discusses current and future conditions in Charlotte’s economy, municipalities, development, and growth.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 27 Issue 4, Apr 1969, p26-47, il, por
Record #:
34434
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The recently opened Blue Line Extension light rail is transforming University City, the area surrounding the University of North Carolina Charlotte. University City Partners has put together a plan for a town center anchored by the JW Clay station that would enhance existing retail and residential development with more density and better connectivity. This development would create a heightened sense of place, the elusive identity the university area has lacked for decades.
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Record #:
34949
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The city of Charlotte has seen fast expansion since the 1970’s, largely due to the Bank of America merger of 1998 by Hugh McColl. McColl, who fought to keep the Bank of America headquarters in Charlotte, used the bank to invest in the arts, professional sports, restaurants, hotels and more in order to keep developing Charlotte.
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Record #:
38171
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An interview with a former Clinton and Obama administrations housing official revealed a perception balancing optimism and realism. He suggests cities can generate progress through initiatives such as infrastructure growth from a responsible management of public assets. Progress can be assured in cities, he believes, by investing in these areas: innovation, infrastructure, and inclusion. As for the growing urban-rural divide, Katz proposes it can be overcome by intermediaries between what he called the core city and rural periphery.