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15 results for Population growth
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Record #:
15999
Author(s):
Abstract:
The southeast is growing at a phenomenal rate. Although this growth has brought many benefits to the region, such as more jobs and higher incomes, the explosive, low-density land use development that is transforming the southeast is linked to an increasing array of environmental, health, economic, and social problems. Public awareness and concern with the problems relating to sprawl have increased, creating pressure for change and significant opportunities to promote new approaches that can capture the benefits of growth while reducing the accompanying costs.
Source:
Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 28 Issue 1, Fall 2002, p21-33, f
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Record #:
18509
Abstract:
Analysis of 1980 census information revealed the state's overall population grew by 800,000 since 1970 and that rural areas experienced the largest population increases rather than cities. Details concerning importance of studying census data and the distribution of this information using computers are discussed. A table is also included showing population change statistics for each county.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 47 Issue 2, Fall 1981, p32-35, il
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Record #:
24653
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mayors of the largest towns in North Carolina, such as Charlotte, Durham, Greensboro, and Winston-Salem, make predictions concerning population growth and the census.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 25, May 1959, p8-9, il
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Record #:
25171
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Abstract:
Whether we choose to accept it or not, the human race is quickly reaching its carrying capacity. What happens when we do is the real problem.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 7 Issue 2, Winter 1988, p4
Record #:
25240
Author(s):
Abstract:
The rapidly increasing population will cause any number of environmental problems involving runoff. This increase has caused a government reaction that may or may not work depending on government commitment both financially and effort-wise.
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Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 20 Issue 2, Spring 2001, p1, 4, il
Record #:
25259
Author(s):
Abstract:
Dave McNaught explains why it is imperative that North Carolina make an active effort to employ successful conservation of natural systems or the state will not be able to support the expected growth numbers in the future.
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Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 21 Issue 4, Fall 2002, p6
Record #:
25281
Author(s):
Abstract:
As there is only a finite amount of water on the planet, drastic measures must be taken to ensure that we do not run through that amount too quickly.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 23 Issue 3, Summer 2004, p6
Record #:
27119
Author(s):
Abstract:
A large crowd attended a public meeting last Thursday in southeast Raleigh. The meeting was about planned updates to the city’s 2030 Comprehensive Plan for population growth and development. Many residents fear that the character of the city is changing immensely.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 18, May 2016, p6, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
28164
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Abstract:
John McLellan, a member of the New Bern Planning and Zoning Board, shares his thoughts and predictions about New Bern in the next twenty-five years. He discusses future growth patterns, development, and issues which may temper growth.
Record #:
30212
Author(s):
Abstract:
Banks that serve rural communities, such as First Bank in Moore County, are being challenged by North Carolina's population growth. As urban areas expand, banks are searching for a way to expand into the Charlotte, Triangle and Triad regions effectively while maintaining their commitment to smaller towns. In this article, bankers discuss the banking industry and its future.
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Record #:
31390
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina has reached a population of six million, ranking as the tenth most populous state. While North Carolina has always been thought of as a heavily rural state, its population density is rather high. The average population per square mile is 120, making the Tar Heel state almost twice as “crowded” as the entire nation.
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Record #:
32662
Author(s):
Abstract:
Preliminary reports of 1980 North Carolina population and housing show the total population in the state to be fifteen-percent higher than in 1970. As compared to other states, North Carolina has become the tenth most populous state during the past decade. This article discusses these population statistics, growth in the number of housing units and city expenditures.
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Record #:
36236
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina’s population reached 10 million by 2017. Factors noted were states of origin, numbers of people moving and out, counties that have decreased and increased in population, and abroad ethnic groups most contributing to the population explosion.
Record #:
37890
Author(s):
Abstract:
Although many animals are endangered or have gone extinct, there are other animals, such as quail and deer that are more plentiful than ever before.
Record #:
38173
Author(s):
Abstract:
The growth rate of fish is an important index to the quality and productivity of a pond or lake. A survey in 1950 was conducted across several lakes in North Carolina comparing amount to fish sixe to lake specifications.