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13 results for Development--Raleigh
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Record #:
17046
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Abstract:
The transformation of Raleigh from a small, compact city to a sprawling metropolis characterized by regional development, regional shopping malls and office complexes occurred during a relatively brief period in the last quarter of the 20th century. Now, in the early years of the 21st century, two Raleigh-based developers are working to internalize that pattern by creating places that reclaim a sense of intimate scale. These places would integrate work space and living space, as well as provide an opportunity for people to park their cars and stroll comfortably and safely to dozens of retail, dining, and entertainment choices.
Source:
Metro Magazine (NoCar F 264 R1 M48), Vol. 4 Issue 7, Aug 2003, p36-39, il, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
25637
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Since 1980, in Wake, Durham, and Orange counties about 10,000 non-residential buildings, 25,000 multi-family units, and 40,000 single-family homes have been built. THE INDEPENDENT examines the architecture of five recently designed structures to find out how each of these building styles will shape the Triangle’s urban landscape.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 4 Issue 1, January 17-30 1986, p1, 10-13, por Periodical Website
Record #:
25779
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The most recent scientific survey of local attitudes toward growth reveals Triangle residents’ complicated feelings about living in a booming region.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 6 Issue 1, January 14-27 1988, p5-9, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
27119
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A large crowd attended a public meeting last Thursday in southeast Raleigh. The meeting was about planned updates to the city’s 2030 Comprehensive Plan for population growth and development. Many residents fear that the character of the city is changing immensely.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 18, May 2016, p6, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
27510
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Some of the Triangle’s biggest issues from the past year are slowly being resolved. Updates to the major news stories since they were first printed are covered. These include the zoning issues in Orange County, traffic congestion in the Triangle, public transportation in the Triangle, downtown development in Raleigh, the merging of Durham’s schools, and the survival of the ArtsCenter in Carrboro.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 8 Issue 50, December 12-18 1990, p10-11 Periodical Website
Record #:
27682
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Phase Two of the Hillsborough Street Revitalization Project is underway. New turnabouts, sidewalks, and bike lines will be extended on the west side of the street and developers are building new mixed-use developments. Current small business owners on the street are unsure how their businesses will be affected by four years of construction and if the city cares about protecting them.
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Record #:
27739
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North Raleigh residents are angry after the city approved a new development project featuring a Publix Grocery store. The development will take place in the designed recreational area for the city and is inconsistent with the city’s 2030 Comprehensive Plan. Residents voted against the voting 522-23 and have petitioned the measure.
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Record #:
27786
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The construction of detached backyard cottages has been banned throughout Raleigh for decades, but many people are opposing the regulation over the popularity of tiny houses. A new proposal would allow detached dwellings citywide as long as they are built to code. Critics are afraid it would lead to urban blight and downtown neighborhoods will lose their appeal as people could turn the dwellings into slums.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 29 Issue 48, November 2012, ponline Periodical Website
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Record #:
27950
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The Bolton property has been labeled the most important property in Raleigh. The property has a chance to become a destination for people due to its location near Hillsborough and West Morgan streets on a primary route heading out of downtown. It is also located at the site of a proposed light-rail line making access easier. A call is made for the city to rezone the property to produce an excellent urban development on the property that will benefit the community and draw people to the area.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 22, June 2010, p9 Periodical Website
Record #:
28148
Author(s):
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Several houses being moved in Raleigh are part of Blount Street Commons, a plan to revitalize the North Blount Street historic district. The redevelopment will happen through a combination of redeveloped homes and new units. As part of this, several houses are being moved from their foundations on North Wilmington Street onto North Blount Street. The moving of the homes will be filmed for National Geographic Channel's Monster Moves program.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 36, September 2008, p49 Periodical Website
Record #:
28054
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Urban planner Dan Douglas has a vision to stimulate Raleigh’s development that is based on designs from major European cities. Douglas’ plan would see various groups in Raleigh donate 120 acres of vacant or underutilized land to Capital City Partners. The group would then take the land and hold an international plan to produce the best possible masterplan for downtown development. This could include new public squares, transit stations, high-tech businesses, high-density, affordable housing, and arts and cultural hubs. The number of jobs downtown could double and the number of people living downtown could increase by 10 times the current amount.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 26 Issue 40, October 2009, p17-19 Periodical Website
Record #:
28325
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Raleigh Planning Director Mitch Silver is helping develop a comprehensive plan for the city which will manage growth and incorporate a rail and bus system. City leaders are intent on changing development patterns from suburban to urban and designing specific transit corridors in the denser urban areas where residents can walk and bike. The city has a chance to end the sprawl and change course for development with the new plan. Details and development of the plan are covered.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 44, October 2007, p15-21 Periodical Website
Record #:
28967
Abstract:
Raleigh’s historic Maiden Lane was born in the shadow of North Carolina State University, and part of a history steeped in fraternity parties and punk rock music. Despite its history, much of Maiden Lane will be re-developed into an apartment complex called Hillstone Cameron Village.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 7, March 2017, p12-14, il, map Periodical Website
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