NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


16 results for Bankers
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 2
Next
Record #:
1218
Author(s):
Abstract:
Ken Lewis, John Georgius, and M. \"Bud\" Baker, are the three apparent successors to the CEOs of NationsBank, First Union, and Wachovia, respectively.
Source:
Record #:
7401
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hope Holding Connell, a member of one of North Carolina's most prominent banking families, is the first woman to chair the North Carolina Bankers Association. She represents the third-generation of the Holding family to lead the association, following her grandfather and uncle. Connell is a graduate of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and has been First Citizens Bank's executive vice president, supervising business banking, since 2000. First Citizens is publicly traded but controlled by the Holding family.
Full Text:
Record #:
9346
Author(s):
Abstract:
Curt Farmer is featured in this month's NC MAGAZINE's “executive profile.” Farmer, a graduate of Wake Forest University, is director of Wachovia Bank's Wealth Management division for the Carolinas and Virginia. He was recently promoted to executive vice president. He manages a team of about 220 wealth management professionals in 22 offices from Charlottesville to Savannah. Besides managing this team, he devotes 30 percent to 40 percent of his time to meeting with clients or courting prospective ones.
Source:
NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 65 Issue 7, July 2007, p30-31, por
Record #:
11177
Abstract:
Thorne Gregory is president of Branch Banking & Trust Company. Gregory is featured in We the People of North Carolina magazine's Businessman in the News.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 31 Issue 2, Feb 1973, p13-14, 16, 48, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
12059
Abstract:
William H. Stanley is chairman and chief executive officer of People Bank & Trust Company. We the People of North Carolina magazine features him in the Businessman in the News section.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 40 Issue 1, Jan 1982, p17-18, 20, 55-56, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
12468
Abstract:
We the People of North Carolina magazine staff posed ten questions to three of the state's leading bankers -- Francis B. Kemp, Paul E. Fisher, and L. Glenn Orr, Jr. -- about what federal deregulation, the advent of interstate banking, mergers and acquisitions, and increasing competition for customers have had on their institutions and their industry.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 44 Issue 3, Mar 1986, p38, 40, 42, 44, 77-78, por
Record #:
24132
Author(s):
Abstract:
Campbell recounts his interview with Hugh McColl Jr., the former CEO of the largest bank in the nation, Bank of America Corp. Hugh discusses what influenced him to take a position at a bank and later build his fortune as CEO.
Subject(s):
Record #:
24157
Author(s):
Abstract:
G. Kennedy Thompson was the owner of Wachovia Bank before it was absorbed by First Union Corp. The author examines Thompson's financial moves that lead to the breaking up of Wachovia.
Source:
Record #:
30212
Author(s):
Abstract:
Banks that serve rural communities, such as First Bank in Moore County, are being challenged by North Carolina's population growth. As urban areas expand, banks are searching for a way to expand into the Charlotte, Triangle and Triad regions effectively while maintaining their commitment to smaller towns. In this article, bankers discuss the banking industry and its future.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
30213
Author(s):
Abstract:
Live Oak Bank, based in Wilmington, North Carolina, is a nontraditional bank that has no branches, no tellers or ATMs. Instead, the bank focuses almost entirely on United States Small Business Administration (SBA) loans. Neil Underwood discusses how Live Oak has used software and technology to become successful.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
30265
Author(s):
Abstract:
Jim Melvin, the former banker and former mayor of Greensboro, discusses a lawsuit from the late 1980s that brought about the demise of many of the country’s savings institutions. One institution that did not survive was 1st Home Federal of Greensboro. Melvin, and the lawsuit in question, maintain that it was the government’s breach of contract that forced management to split up and sell off the institution.
Source:
Carolina Banker (HG 2153 N8 C66), Vol. 86 Issue 3, Fall 2007, p29-30, por
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
30314
Abstract:
Community banking can lead to many different opportunities and relationships. Johnny Caddy, vice president of The Bank of Currituck, has helped finance and build monster trucks, including Dennis Anderson’s famous Gravedigger. Caddy and Anderson recently developed a new entertainment park in Currituck County called Dennis Anderson’s Muddy Motor Sports.
Source:
Carolina Banker (HG 2153 N8 C66), Vol. 87 Issue 3, Fall 2008, p7-8, il, por
Full Text:
Record #:
30364
Author(s):
Abstract:
Jonathan Felts of the American Banking Association discusses the political climate for North Carolina bankers, and the association’s current legislative and regulatory priorities. With the upcoming elections in November, Felts explains how grassroots are effective in government relations, and advises bankers on what they can do to help the industry and local economic development.
Source:
Carolina Banker (HG 2153 N8 C66), Vol. 91 Issue 2, Summer 2012, p12-14, por
Record #:
30381
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article addresses several core questions from North Carolina bankers, which include topics on the regulatory environment, the consolidation of community banks, and the future of deferred tax assets. Discussion also considers the recovery of North Carolina’s economy in association with the state’s new governor.
Source:
Carolina Banker (HG 2153 N8 C66), Vol. 91 Issue 4, Winter 2012, p40-41, por
Record #:
30402
Author(s):
Abstract:
Forest Commercial Bank was one of the last de novo banks chartered in North Carolina. John Kimberly, president and CEO of Forest Commercial Bank in Asheville, explains how the bank was formed and how it has grown and prospered. Kimberly also discusses how the bank has been impacted by the Dodd-Frank Act and recent banking regulations.
Source:
Carolina Banker (HG 2153 N8 C66), Vol. 92 Issue 2, Summer 2013, p74-75, por