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6 results for Raver, Duane
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Record #:
13240
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Leon Brown, a rural mail carrier who lives in Selma, North Carolina, has a set-up for raising big, active, hybrid earthworms. Besides being fun, the hobby pays off when Brown markets the worms during the fishing season; he has even produced a hybrid of worms developed from Neuse River blue worms and red wrigglers.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 21 Issue 1, June 1953, p6, f
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Record #:
6635
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From the freshwater ponds behind the dunes on the Outer Banks to mountain lakes in the western counties, the largemouth bass is the number one game fish of North Carolina anglers. The bass is not a commercial fish, and its sale is strictly prohibited in the state. Raver describes the fish and discusses its habitant, life history, and importance as a high quality sport fish.
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Record #:
6768
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Statistics on boating accidents were compiled for the first time in 1960. That year 79 boating accidents were reported, with 37 fatalities. In 1963, there were 68 reported accidents, and fatalities had dropped to 26. This marked reduction may reflect a growing awareness that as the waterways become more crowded, more attention must be given to water safety. Raver discusses the time of day when accidents happened; bodies of water where accidents happened, such as lakes, rivers, and ponds; size of the boat; and what the boat operator was doing.
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Record #:
8179
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Catfish fall into two categories, freshwater and saltwater. In his article Raver discusses only freshwater catfish; examines misconceptions about catfish; and explains why anglers don't like this fish. The more abundant catfish in the state are the flathead, blue, channel, white, brown bullhead, and yellow bullhead. The flathead, native to a few western North Carolina river systems, is the largest, with a maximum weight of over one hundred pounds. The group of catfish known as madtoms are the smallest, with few species exceeding six inches.
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Record #:
8199
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The state has three species of trout--the brook, rainbow, and brown. Raver describes some common characteristics of the three fish and some differences. The brook is the only one native to North Carolina and is the one most easily caught. The brown is the most difficult to catch. The rainbow seldom spawns in any water that is not swiftly flowing.
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Record #:
31265
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Meaning Dry Dust in Native American, Lake Mattamuskeet is a freshwater saucer thirteen miles long, five miles wide and less than six feet deep. Covering almost a sixth of Hyde County, North Carolina, Lake Mattamuskeet is the winter home of tens of thousands of Canadian Geese and a National Waterfowl Refuge. The Refuge is cooperatively managed for public hunting by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and NC Wildlife Resources Commission.
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