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17 results for Fishing--North Carolina
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Record #:
13763
Author(s):
Abstract:
When Aycock Brown lights the firecracker, it means the fishing year has begun.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 43, Mar 1952, p3-5, f
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Record #:
13905
Abstract:
Tar Heels who want real fishing don't need to leave their own state, because North Carolina has anything from rainbow trout to tarpon.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 18 Issue 7, July 1950, p4, 18, f
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Record #:
24131
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author discusses how commercial fishing in North Carolina waters has become more difficult as a result of declining fish populations, increased regulation, and overseas competition.
Record #:
24539
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author highlights some of the popular fishing spots on North Carolina’s coast and discusses the fishing industry in the state.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 43 Issue 9, February 1976, p13-14, il
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Record #:
24622
Author(s):
Abstract:
The first swordfish caught off the coast if North Carolina was taken in 1959. Since then, a swordfishing boom has taken place in many coastal towns, helping to boost the local economies.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 31 Issue 22, March 1964, p7-8, il
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Record #:
25974
Author(s):
Abstract:
The variety and abundance of fishing, in both salt and freshwater, makes fishing in North Carolina one of the best places during the spring. Various species are abundant in all manner of locations from surf to river and lake.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 19 Issue 2, Mar-Apr 1975, p17, 24
Record #:
25988
Author(s):
Abstract:
Sunfish, rainbow trout, and brown trout, some of North Carolina’s most popular fishing species, are actually not native to the state. These species, among others, were brought to North Carolina and stocked in the 1800s.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 19 Issue 3, Summer 1975, p26, 28
Record #:
26551
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission adopted new regulations to protect coastal and inland striped bass, allow for better stocking of trout, and reduce issues with hatcheries.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 24 Issue (27) 12, Dec 1980, p4-5
Record #:
26604
Author(s):
Abstract:
Freshwater and saltwater fishing pressure has become heavy in North Carolina. Managers are exploring new management alternatives and promoting fishing ethics.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 35 Issue 3, May/June 1988, p13, il
Record #:
26616
Author(s):
Abstract:
While camping in the rain may not be desired, rain often makes for better fishing in North Carolina. Insects knocked into the lakes and streams by wind and rain attract insect-eating fish, such as bluegills, luring them closer to the water’s surface. Raindrops also break up the surface water, making it harder for fish to see the fishermen.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 35 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1988, p14-15, il
Record #:
22450
Abstract:
From the colonial periods to the early twentieth century, fishing constituted a major economic activity in North Carolina. There is early evidence of commercial fisheries and distinct traditions of fishing shad, herring, rock, bass and sturgeon.
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Record #:
27333
Author(s):
Abstract:
This insert provides data on the recreational and commercial fishing industries in North Carolina for 2015. Examined are the top 5 fish caught in both commercial and recreational fisheries, highlights autumn’s seasonal catches, and fishing’s economic impact.
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Record #:
28571
Author(s):
Abstract:
Good fishing can be found at most of the state parks in North Carolina. The best places to fish, the type of fish stocked at each park, and the best times of year to fish are described for 12 state parks. The fishing at Lake Norman, New River, South Mountains, Jordan Lake, Kerr Lake, Morrow Mountain, Fort Fisher, Fort Macon, Merchants Millpond, Pettigrew, Hanging Rock, and Eno River State Parks are all detailed. Hanging Rock, Eno River, and Fort Macon are highlighted with anecdotes and advice from parks employees and local fishing experts.
Record #:
31400
Abstract:
The North Carolina Wildlife Commission provides a listing of areas that provide fishing and boating access across North Carolina. From lakes and rivers to reservoirs and beaches, North Carolina offers a large variety of access points for all manner of recreational boating and fishing activities.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 23 Issue 2, June 1965, p17-19, por, map
Record #:
34400
Abstract:
Ocean fishing piers have been a part of the North Carolina seascape for over ninety years, since the construction of the state’s first ocean pier at Kure Beach in 1923. In the 1970s through the late 1980s, as many as thirty-five functioning fishing piers graced over three-hundred miles of North Carolina’s ocean coastline. Because different species tend to gravitate to different areas of the surf, there are five fishing zones along the pier which require different techniques and gear.