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15 results for Population--Statistics
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Record #:
1220
Abstract:
The 1990 Census revealed four trends in North Carolina's population: it contains more urban dwellers, more minorities, fewer poor, and more elderly. These trends are sure to affect policy decisions in the future.
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Record #:
2915
Author(s):
Abstract:
Between 1990 and 1995, the state's metropolitan areas grew faster than non-metropolitan ones, with the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill and Wilmington areas showing the largest growth rate.
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Record #:
3130
Author(s):
Abstract:
The 1995 Municipal Estimates lists 527 municipalities in the state. Of these, 14 have populations above 50,000 and 384 have populations of less than 1,000, with Delview, in Gaston County, the smallest at ten.
Source:
State Planning Newsletter (NoCar HD 87.5 S72), Vol. 3 Issue 4, Fall 1996, p3-5, il
Record #:
12834
Abstract:
The population counts for North Carolina's one hundred counties, for the year 1960, are provided in the form of a list.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 28 Issue 17, Jan 1961, p8
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Record #:
12843
Abstract:
The populations of all incorporated places as well as unincorporated places with populations of 1,000 or more individuals in North Carolina are offered in this list.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 28 Issue 19, Feb 1961, p14-16
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Record #:
13409
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina may not be economically self-sufficient, but it grows its own population, with 86 percent of the population being North Carolinian born and raised.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 21 Issue 23, Nov 1953, p1, il
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Record #:
13607
Abstract:
Here is contained the complete report on the 1950 census population figures for North Carolina.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 9, July 1951, p8-11
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Record #:
14065
Abstract:
Based on a letter written to The State, this article includes population totals for North Carolina counties in 1790. There is a brief political discussion about how many counties North Carolina should have and counties added since 1790.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 16 Issue 1, June 1948, p16
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Record #:
24653
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mayors of the largest towns in North Carolina, such as Charlotte, Durham, Greensboro, and Winston-Salem, make predictions concerning population growth and the census.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 25, May 1959, p8-9, il
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Record #:
22654
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Abstract:
Through unique culture and ecosystems, North Carolina's coastal communities offer varied assets, but these assets also create unique challenges. Population growth and decrease are happening in coastal counties, as well as changes to job composition and commuting. Therefore, there are also changing coastal transportation needs, giving priority to coastal highways, bridges, and ferries.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 2, Spring 2015, p6-11, por Periodical Website
Record #:
30146
Author(s):
Abstract:
According to the 1950 Census, the south is still the most populous region in the United States. Despite a century of westward expansion, states like North Carolina are leading the pack with an estimated count of over 4,000,000 citizens.
Record #:
31390
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina has reached a population of six million, ranking as the tenth most populous state. While North Carolina has always been thought of as a heavily rural state, its population density is rather high. The average population per square mile is 120, making the Tar Heel state almost twice as “crowded” as the entire nation.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 15 Issue 3, Mar 1983, p25
Record #:
32662
Author(s):
Abstract:
Preliminary reports of 1980 North Carolina population and housing show the total population in the state to be fifteen-percent higher than in 1970. As compared to other states, North Carolina has become the tenth most populous state during the past decade. This article discusses these population statistics, growth in the number of housing units and city expenditures.
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Record #:
36993
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Abstract:
Because of recent immigration trends, approximately forty percent of people receiving American citizenship were not born in North Carolina. Moreover, in nearly one-fifth of the state’s counties, naturalized citizens comprise a majority of the population. As for other ways naturalized citizens have affected the state, the author examines tangible and intangible factors. The tangible includes food and tradition; the intangible includes a sense of hope and determination.
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Record #:
37800
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Abstract:
Beginning during waterfowl hunting season of 1947-48, an investigation into the waterfowl situation in North Carolina was undertaken. This investigation became a part of the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission’s Federal Aid Research Project. The information contained in this article is part of those findings. Contains tables, graphs, and data for the past three hunting seasons.