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15 results for Urban renewal
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Record #:
496
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Developers, municipalities, and citizens have become the major players in the urban development scene, each with its own power base and mode of interaction.
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Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 12 Issue 1, Summer 1986, p10-17, il, bibl, f
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Record #:
3836
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A feature of the Economic Opportunity Act provides new tax credits for businesses that create jobs in blighted urban areas. About fifty cities in the state, including Greenville and Kinston, have identified areas of this type.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 56 Issue 9, Sept 1998, p16, il
Record #:
4057
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Before a brownfield, an underused or abandoned commercial or industrial site having contaminants, could be used, the site had to be totally cleaned up. Liability for the old pollution rested with the new owners. The Brownfield Property Reuse Act of 1997 removed that liability from potential developers.
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Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 49 Issue 1, Jan 1999, p11
Record #:
4065
Author(s):
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Brownfields are underused or abandoned industrial or commercial sites having contaminants that affect potential profitability. Sites could not be used unless totally cleaned up; new owners could be held liable for any pollution problems from the old site. The Brownfields Property Reuse Act of 1997 is more flexible in its approach to usage and removes these restrictions from potential developers. While the law removes major impediments, dangers of contaminants may still exist.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 64 Issue 2, Winter 1999, p2-11, il, f
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Record #:
5922
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Brownfields are underused or abandoned commercial or industrial sites at which on-site contaminants adversely affect profitability. Lail discusses the North Carolina Brownfield program that \"gives a potential buyer the ability - without liability - to take a neglected, contaminated site and make it a safe and clean property and economically viable property.\"
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Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 53 Issue 7, July 2003, p4-5, il
Record #:
7163
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Begun in 1980 as a project for the National Trust for Historic Preservation, the North Carolina Main Street program has assisted cities in revitalizing and preserving their central business districts. In the past twenty-five years Main Street Program towns have created over 10,000 new jobs and rehabilitated over 2,500 buildings.
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Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 55 Issue 2, Feb 2005, p4-5, il
Record #:
7464
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The North Carolina Main Street Program, a part of the Department of Commerce's Division of Community Assistance, is celebrating its twenty-fifth anniversary in 2005. North Carolina was one of the six original states to participate in the program. Since 1980, fifty-three towns across the state have signed up. The program promotes preservation and economic development in downtown areas. Caldwell profiles several program participants, Edenton, New Bern, Salisbury, Shelby, and Waynesville.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 6, Nov 2005, p86-92, 94-95, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
9554
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Lail discusses North Carolina cities that are restoring abandoned buildings to use as municipal buildings for administrative offices, as well as police, fire, and public works. Among the cities are Carthage, Morganton, and Mount Holly.
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Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 57 Issue 9, Sept 2007, p1, 12, il
Record #:
16299
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One of the constructive adaptations to segregation was to set up community cafes, corner stores, and other businesses. Morrison's Cafe was one such business, and show shot these enterprises contributed to the life of a black community. The cafe provided not only cheap, good meals for poor factory workers, but also generated jobs for unemployed blacks. Although urban renewal and integration are considered two causes of the disintegration of distinctly black communities in areas such as Winston-Salem, places like Morrison's Cafe figured prominently for a time in the social and economic life of close-knot communities.
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Record #:
22715
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The East End/Valley Street neighborhood and the Nasty Branch Creek fostered a collective identity for the black public in Asheville, North Carolina in the 1950s-1970s. In the face of urban renewal, this neighborhood and surrounding environment provided economic opportunities and social networks.
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Record #:
29123
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After lagging behind in the urban renewal trend, Greensboro, North Carolina is getting its tallest new building since 1990. The $24 million project will be a nine-story office building that overlooks the First National Bank Field, home of the Greensboro Grasshoppers minor-league baseball team.
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Record #:
36198
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A lot of renovation work was invested in the transformation of a parking lot into a city park. Including elements such as a clock, type of tree imported from Italy, and Spartanburg County medallion map made the ten year venture a labor of love.
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Record #:
36291
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Built in 1899, the building once housing the Caffe Phoenix got a new lease on life, courtesy of developer magnates such as James Goodnight. Part of his vision for downtown Wilmington is it becoming the hub for tech startups and companies seeking office space in an urban area.
Record #:
39588
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This urban revival project, initiated by Myers Park Presbyterian Church, sought to offer families in Charlotte’s Grier Heights better housing. Constructed by the church’s nonprofit CrossRoads, it consists of 35 mixed income housing sold to individuals making 80% of area median income. Other endeavors undertaken by CrossRoads to improve the surrounding area include after-school programs and continuing education opportunities.
Record #:
39936
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The loss of Sycamore Hill Missionary Baptist Church, noted center for black activity in Greenville, was also a loss for the greater community it long supported. With an intent to celebrate rather than mourn, though, was “Beyond Bricks and Mortar,” an oral history project coordinated by Joyner Library. This project revealed the lives of generations of black residents who contributed to the development of Greenville. Also acknowledging their presence in the community was Sam Barber’s A Journey for Purchasing and Naming the Brown Hill Cemetery. His book chronicled the initiative to transfer bodies of those buried in the church’s cemetery to nearby Brown Hill Cemetery.
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