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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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22 results for Trees
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Record #:
11252
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Abstract:
North Carolina is home to several unique and rare trees, among them - Abies fraseri, Tsuga caroliniana, Crataegus roanesis. These trees are under control of the United States government in some areas and are an important part of North Carolina's ecosystem. Logging of these trees is restricted, and permits are required.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 33 Issue 3, July 1965, p9, 17, il
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Record #:
11314
Author(s):
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North Carolina's diverse vegetation and ecosystem are an important part of the state's appeal. Springtime marks the beginning of growth for the state as the Juneberry and Shadbush blossom. Native plants and trees such as the Dogwoods, Redbuds, and other fauna grow abundantly throughout the state. These numerous plants are an attractive element of North Carolina.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 33 Issue 20, Mar 1966, p8-9, 38, il
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Record #:
11481
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Jordan describes the native trees of North Carolina. In the number of native trees in the nation, Florida is first with 328; Texas second with 198; and North Carolina third with 166.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 1 Issue 32, Jan 1934, p9, il
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Record #:
14971
Abstract:
There are quite a number of historic trees which are associated with important historical events during the early history of North Carolina and they are found in all sections of the State. Outstanding among them are three which are located at the Guilford Battleground, formerly known as Guilford Courthouse, near Greensboro.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 10 Issue 33, Jan 1943, p4-5, f
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Record #:
15284
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Abstract:
Chapel Hill is truly the land of the trees - recently, the North Carolina garden club designated the University arboretum to become a tree school where every garden club in the State may visit to learn and study various trees. More than 500 varieties of trees and shrubs grow in the arboretum.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 7 Issue 40, Mar 1940, p4-5, 20, f
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Record #:
16871
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Abstract:
Coastal trees not only provide welcome shade to residents and visitors, but they also offer water- and air-quality benefits. This ongoing Sustainability Series includes a section on trees and plants and their benefits to the community.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Spring 2011, p14-19, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
17365
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Abstract:
Fair recommends tress to plant for the mountains, Piedmont, midlands, and coast. The list is not exhaustive and the author chooses trees that she knows are successful in these areas--drought tolerant, excellent bloom or fall color, and do well in most soils.
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Record #:
24574
Author(s):
Abstract:
The toothache tree is a species of prickly ash, Zanthoxylum americanum, that indigenous groups in North America used to cure toothaches. They chewed the bark and leaves from this tree to relieve pain.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 39 Issue 24, May 1972, p13-14, il
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Record #:
24591
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Colonel Thomas Bloodworth discovered a hollowed out Cyprus tree that he then used to harass the British who had occupied Wilmington during the American Revolutionary War.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 36 Issue 5, August 1968, p7-8
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Record #:
24702
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Abstract:
The Boundary Tree, located near the Oconaluftee River in North Carolina, is also known as the Poplar Corner Tree and has served as a boundary marker for a number of properties since 1798. The author briefly outlines the history of this well-known tree.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 20 Issue 12, August 1952, p5, 17
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Record #:
25280
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Trees do more for the environment than most people think about. Without them, billions of dollars more would be needed to manage storm water alone. Trees are essentially the backbone of a healthy environment.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 23 Issue 3, Summer 2004, p4, il
Record #:
27280
Author(s):
Abstract:
For over twenty years, Chris and Marty McCurry have been fashioning salvaged tree bark into decorative wall coverings. Based in Spruce Pine, the Highland Craftsmen Inc. collects bark from trees harvested by Southern Appalachian logging companies and creates something new out of it.
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Record #:
34381
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Brothers Tim and Matt Nichols run one of the largest Japanese maple tree operations in the country, propagating and shipping more than one-thousand cultivars. Their business, Mr. Maple nursery, is located in East Flat Rock, Henderson County. In addition to the maples, the Nichols brothers grow nearly five-hundred other kinds of woody ornamental shrubs, including varieties of ginkgo trees and dawn redwoods.
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Record #:
35690
Abstract:
Wood was espoused as a viable alternative heat source and solution for the energy crisis. As proof that wood was a cut above the rest economically, the author included examples of the best types, such as ash, beech, and dogwood, and the only necessary equipment, a chain saw and axe.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1978, p
Record #:
35800
Abstract:
Faulkner revealed sources for the team names of several well-known colleges across the US. Included were state bird (University of Delaware Blue Hens), a Civil War regimen (Kansas State Jayhawkers), a type of tree (Ohio State Buckeyes), and Native American tribes (Miami University Redskins). The one she discussed the most, though, was the Carolina Tar Heels, offering three explanations for a team name that has also become a nickname for North Carolina.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1979, p48