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12 results for Trees--North Carolina
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Record #:
14147
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With 166 varieties of trees in the state, North Carolina is ranked third in the United States, but if you count vines, shrubs, and other foliage, the number jumps to 450.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 17 Issue 24, Nov 1949, p5
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Record #:
24574
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The toothache tree is a species of prickly ash, Zanthoxylum americanum, that indigenous groups in North America used to cure toothaches. They chewed the bark and leaves from this tree to relieve pain.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 39 Issue 24, May 1972, p13-14, il
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Record #:
24702
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The Boundary Tree, located near the Oconaluftee River in North Carolina, is also known as the Poplar Corner Tree and has served as a boundary marker for a number of properties since 1798. The author briefly outlines the history of this well-known tree.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 20 Issue 12, August 1952, p5, 17
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Record #:
25634
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A forest of red spruces and Fraser firs covers 72,000 acres of land atop the North Carolina mountains. The spruce-fir ecosystem is dying due to poisons man has put into the air that often fall back as acid rain.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 3 Issue 20, November 8-21 1985, p1, 8-9, por Periodical Website
Record #:
28533
Author(s):
Abstract:
The American Chestnut Foundation is working to restore the chestnut tree to America. The conditions for the tree’s disappearance are detailed along with the foundation's breeding program. The foundation is breeding hybrid chestnut trees and has had some success. Their work and their mission are described.
Record #:
28677
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A photoessay survey’s the state’s old-growth forests from the mountains to the sea. Photographs of the forests and trees provide a look at what North Carolina looked like before it was settled. Photos of Eastern hemlocks, live oaks, American holly, bald cypress, longleaf pine, Fraser magnolia, chestnut oaks, and tulip poplars are pictured.
Record #:
29781
Abstract:
The woods are a professional passion for Frank Rackley. Rackley manages the North Carolina timberlands for Weyerhaeuser near New Bern. Rackley and his employees take care of the trees throughout their life cycle, operating through high environmental standards.
Source:
NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 67 Issue 1, Jan 2009, p42-43, por
Record #:
34805
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Abstract:
Native gardens are becoming popular as their reputation for minimal upkeep spreads. In North Carolina, indigenous tree species, such as magnolias and southern live oaks, can co-exist with smaller varieties of flower, such as azaleas, hydrangea, and phlox. Moving to native species can cut down on the negative environmental impacts of invasive species.
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Record #:
34803
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The Emerald Ash Borer is an insect that attacks ash trees, of which there are four native species to North Carolina. Originally from Asia, it has been found in 24 states total. Symptoms and preventative measures are also presented in this article.
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Record #:
34804
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Pears are one of the hardiest and easiest fruiting trees to plant in North Carolina. Not only do they yield fruit early, but they are also cost-effective, can cross-pollinate, and sprout beautiful white flowers in the Spring.
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Record #:
35893
Abstract:
It was an enlightened response to the energy crisis, educating about an eco-friendly fuel source. Cited were virtues of stoves and types of burners. Observed were good tree types. To remove danger from a daring alternative, provided were books like Using Coal and Wood Burning Stoves Safely and Barnacle Parp’s Chain Saw Guide. As for reasons not prosaic, highlighted were activities generating what he called the “aesthetic charm” of the fireside.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 7, Sept 1980, p14-16
Record #:
38503
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Abstract:
As declared in 1923, Arbor Day falls on the first Friday after March 15. On this day, school children and civic organizations plant trees, which have led to millions of tree seedlings being planted over the years.